Current statistics Numbers.docx happy - Current statistics Numbers 1 GDP 0.4 Reference http\/countryeconomy.com\/gdp\/canada?year=2015 2 Inflation 1.3

Current statistics Numbers.docx happy

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Current statistics Numbers1.GDP0.4%Reference- 2.Inflation 1.3%Reference-3.Interest Rate 0.5171%4.Unemployment 7%5.Gold $1703.46 per ounce6.Oil $43.677.S&P TSX $14801.82 8.Target Rate for Inflation 2% (1%-3%)9.Canadian dollar vs. US dollar $1.3410.Quarterly population estimate 0.4%11.Manufacturing sales 0.9%12.Natural rate of unemployment 6.0%
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Inflation rate jumps as impact of declining loonie takes hold Greg Quinn Bloomberg NewsPublished Friday, Feb. 19, 2016 8:37AM EST Last updated Friday, Feb. 19, 2016 10:04AM ESThe Canadian dollar’s sharp drop over the past year is beginning to stoke inflation.The consumer price index rose 2 per cent in January from a year earlier, Statistics Canada said Friday from Ottawa, the highest since November 2014 as the U.S. dollar’s gain drives up food costs in Canada.The jump in prices, which exceeded economist expectations, poses a problem for a central bank that is scrambling to shore up growth with historically low borrowing costs as the country struggles with a plunge in commodity prices. Worries about the impact of the currency kept Governor Stephen Poloz from cutting interest rates last month.Not a good picture for Canadian consumers: economist (BNN Video) “All those anecdotes about higher cauliflower prices certainly came through in this report,” said David Tulk, chief Canada macro strategist at Toronto Dominion Bank. It “speaks to the concern the Bank of Canada had which probably made them more cautious about cutting rates last month.”Poloz’s decision to keep his benchmark rate at 0.5 per cent at a rate decision on Jan. 20 halted a slide in the currency that saw the Canadian dollar fall to a 13-year low.The depreciation sparked a wave of on-line discussions and news stories, with the price of cauliflower – which jumped to more than $7 – a lightning rod.
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Fresh VegetablesFood costs rose 4 per cent in January from a year earlier, including an 18.2 per cent surge in
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