Electrical Billing and Rates presentation

Electrical Billing and Rates presentation - Electrical...

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Electrical Billing and Rates MAE406 Energy Conservation in Industry Stephen Terry
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Where Does Electricity for Industrial Plants Come From? Most from Investor Owned Utilities (IOU’s) like Electricities and NC Co-ops in small towns and rural locations May be generated on-site in Combined Heat and Power CHP) applications
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How is Electricity Generated? Nuclear plants are baseloaded since they are cheap to operate and need long hours to pay back initial investment Coal / Oil / Gas Boilers – moderate cost Natural Gas Turbines – expensive to operate, used only for peak use
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Power vs. Energy Power is a rate quantity - 1 kW = 1 kJ/sec Energy is measured using kJ or kWh Note: 1 kWh = 1 kJ-hr/sec = 3,600 kJ Energy = × ) ( time d Power
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Parts of an Electric Bill Service Charge: Constant regardless of electrical energy use. Typically between $5 and $500 per month Energy Charge: charge based on amount of energy (kWh) used Demand Charge: charge based on highest power required during interval Taxes, Rebates, and Other Charges
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Residential Bill Energy Charge: about $0.095/kWh for energy used in the summer and $0.085/kWh for winter. Demand Charge: does not apply since household is small user Taxes, Rebates: varies with user
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Industrial plants can use 1,000 kW or more of power. Power company must build capacity to meet the maximum load, even if it is used only a few hours per day air conditioners in the summer. Peak loads occur infrequently and must be met
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This note was uploaded on 08/01/2008 for the course MAE 406 taught by Professor Eckerlin,terry during the Fall '07 term at N.C. State.

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Electrical Billing and Rates presentation - Electrical...

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