Crop Management Cropping Systems 2001-2007

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Pest Reaction, Yield, and Economic Return of Peanut Cropping Systems in the North Carolina Coastal Plain David L. Jordan , Professor, Department of Crop Science, Box 7620, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620; Barbara B. Shew , Associate Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, Box 7903, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7903; J. Steven Barnes and Tommy Corbett , former and current Superintendents and Joel Alston , Research Specialist, Peanut Belt Research Station, North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Box 220, Lewiston- Woodville, 27849; P. Dewayne Johnson , Research Specialist, Department of Crop Science, Box 7620, Raleigh, NC 27695-7620; W. Ye , Nematologist, North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, 4300 Reedy Reek Rd., Raleigh, NC 27607-6465; and Rick L. Brandenburg , Department of Entomology, Box 7613, Raleigh, NC 27695-7613. Corresponding author: [email protected] Abstract Research was conducted in North Carolina from 2001-2006 to determine disease and nematode development, yield, and estimated economic return in rotation systems including corn ( Zea mays L.), cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L.), peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.), and soybean [ Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Specific rotations included three cycles of corn-peanut and cotton-peanut and two cycles of corn-corn-peanut, cotton- 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
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corn-peanut, cotton-cotton-peanut, soybean-corn-peanut, and soybean-cotton-peanut. Additional rotations included corn-corn-corn-corn-corn-peanut and continuous peanut. In the final year of the experiment, the cultivars Gregory and NC 12C were planted either without or following fumigation with metam sodium 2 weeks before planting. Increasing the number of years between peanut plantings increased yield of peanut in the final year of the experiment when peanut was not fumigated. Fumigating with metam sodium or planting the cultivar NC 12C, a cultivar with resistance to Cylindrocladium black rot (caused by Cylindrocladium parasiticum ) (CBR), compensated for shorter rotations between peanut plantings. Although peanut yield was higher when rotation length was increased, the highest cumulative net returns often were noted when peanut was included two or more times during the duration of the experiment compared with peanut planted only at the end of the experiment. Introduction Corn, cotton, peanut, and soybean are commonly grown in the coastal plain of North Carolina. Economic value of these crops varies considerably and influences producers’ decisions on crop selection (21). Crop rotation can have a dramatic impact on development of pests and subsequent crop yield. However, economic return over years is associated with income generated by each crop in the rotation and not necessarily the rotation that is most biologically advantageous (21). Growers must balance the benefits of rotating lower value crops that are effective in reducing pest and pathogen
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This note was uploaded on 08/01/2008 for the course SSC 462 taught by Professor Havlin during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

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Crop Management Cropping Systems 2001-2007 - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7...

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