CS 462 Statistics

CS 462 Statistics - The Use of Statistics in Crop...

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The Use of Statistics in Crop Management
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Management The act, manner, or practice of handling, or controlling something To direct, supervise, or carry on business affairs Making and implementing a decision
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Critical Thinking Characterized by careful and exact evaluation and judgement (American Heritage Dictionary)
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Why, When, and How? (…should we do something)
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Why ? Why should I plant this crop? Why should I plant this variety? Why should I use this product? Why is the tillage system important?
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When? When should I plant? When should I harvest? When should I spray? When should I apply nutrients?
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How? How do I maximize profit? How do I minimize the environmental impact? How do I manage risk? How do I know when to do what in crop management? How does this product perform? How does its performance compare to other products? How much does it cost vs. the expected return?
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Rules: 1) Draw 4 straight lines that intersect all of the dots without lifting your pencil. 2) Two minutes.
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Rules: 1) Draw 4 straight lines that intersect all of the dots without lifting your pencil. 2) Two minutes.
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Biased Information Self-imposed limits on thinking Improper techniques involving information collection Improper interpretation of results Biased source/personal agenda or filter Everyone has an opinion and everyone has an agenda – how do we sort through opinions and agendas?
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Roles in Agriculture Adviser Extension Agent NCDA Agronomist NRCS Consultant Agribusiness Support and Sales Farm Manager/Owner Regulator NRCS DENR EPA
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Importance of Objectivity The best decisions are based on the best possible information Objectivity is critical in effective advising, management, and regulation
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Decision Making Based on Data Analysis Questions to ask: Where was the location? How many locations? How many years of data? Who conducted the test? Was it statistically analyzed? Are all of the data shown? Is it a test or a testimonial?
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An Experiment is: A planned inquiry to obtain new facts or to confirm or deny results of previous experiments (Steele and Torrie) Results will be used in making a decision
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Experiments vs. Observational Studies Controlled Experiment : Experimental Units (treatments) are assigned randomly under controlled conditions in a manner to define cause and effect relationships in order to keep factors other than treatment constant Observational Study : Observe a selected population and record what you see (provides a report of observations)
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Agricultural Applications of Statistical Analysis The basic purpose of statistical analysis is to measure variability in observations across an experiment and to assign that variability to known effects (treatment and replication) and unknown effects (error). A high ratio of variability from known sources to
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This note was uploaded on 08/01/2008 for the course SSC 462 taught by Professor Havlin during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

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CS 462 Statistics - The Use of Statistics in Crop...

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