Nicomachean ethics

Nicomachean ethics - Nicomachean Ethics: Book I All human...

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Nicomachean Ethics: Book I All human activities aim at an end that is considered good, but the highest good is something sought after for its own sake. In Book I, Aristotle says happiness is the chief good. Happiness is the greatest good because it is an end in itself. Other things may be ends in themselves as well, but they are also good because they make us happy. Happiness is the highest good because it meets Aristotle’s criteria; it is an end in itself and it is self-sufficient. In figuring out what happiness is exactly, Aristotle reasons that the function of man is acting according to reason; therefore, the good, happiness, must also be in accordance with reason and virtue. This function of man sets us apart from other beings. Only something with complete use of reason could ever be considered happy. Brandon Baker PHI 1308 11/01/07 Nicomachean Ethics: Book III There are necessary and sufficient conditions for how to obtain a virtue, possess a virtue, and exercise a virtue. Virtue has to do with feelings and actions, and in evaluating these actions we
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Nicomachean ethics - Nicomachean Ethics: Book I All human...

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