Utilitarianism Chapter V

Utilitarianism Chapter V - There are two components to...

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Brandon Baker PHI 1308 10/02/07 Utilitarianism Chapter V Mill’s main point in the fifth chapter is that utility is the foundation of justice. He begins by examining characteristics of justice. People are aware of justice without having to know its foundation. Mill lists things that are thought of by people to be just or unjust. Depriving legal rights is unjust. Violating agreements is unjust. Getting what is deserved is just. These examples only serve to help unify our ideas of justice. To distinguish justice further, Mill looks at the difference between perfect and imperfect obligations. Imperfect obligations are those that nobody has the right to require of someone else. Perfect obligations are those that one person may demand of someone else. Mill thinks justice has something to do with perfect obligations and personal rights.
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Unformatted text preview: There are two components to justice. The first is the desire to punish a person who has done harm, to retaliate. And second, there is an identifiable victim when justice is violated. Since injustice can affect an individual and a society, justice is a moral concern. And since the ideas of rights are not separate from justice, but are necessary for justice and human well-being, justice also has components of utility. Justice has moral requirements and is also grounded in utility. For people to enjoy anything and have the greatest amount of happiness, rights must be protected. Justice is the name for certain moral requirements that stand high in the scale of social utility and are of greater obligation. Mill does admit that in ensuring total happiness, rights for one individual may be violated....
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This note was uploaded on 08/04/2008 for the course PHI 1308 taught by Professor Alexander during the Fall '07 term at Baylor.

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