The Effects of the Black Death on Europe's economy and culture - THE BLACK DEATHS EFFECTS ON EUROPES ECONOMY AND CULTURE The Black Deaths Effects on

The Effects of the Black Death on Europe's economy and culture

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THE BLACK DEATH’S EFFECTS ON EUROPE’S ECONOMY AND CULTURE The Black Death’s Effects on Europe’s Economy and Culture Christopher S. Thompson Columbia Southern University The Black Death first emerged in 1347 in Western Europe from Genoese ships that were traveling along the trade routes. The Black Death is believed to be the bubonic plague that is transmitted from rats and fleas to humans and results in a terrible and painful death with a few days after it is contracted. It was spread by direct contact or through airborne droplets when the infected coughed or vomited. The rapid spread of the disease and the quick death from the disease had major impacts on Europe. The impacts on the economy and culture are very evident and directly related to the reduction of the European population by around one third or 50 million. The history of Europe just before the Black Death epidemic must also be considered because it helped to influence the rapid spread of the disease. During the years of 1000 to 1300 all of Europe was generally considered to be in a famine (McKay et al,. 2014). Farming was extremely hard and the production was not sufficient to support the population. This famine 1
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