13-IE-25Feb-08-MacIntosh

13-IE-25Feb-08-MacIntosh - Solid Waste Strategic Plan City...

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Unformatted text preview: Solid Waste Strategic Plan City of Santa Barbara March 5, 2007 1 5-Year Strategic Plan - Introduction Progress made diverting City's municipal solid waste from landfills Characteristics of City's waste stream Recommended action plan to achieve diversion goals 2 2002 SOLID WASTE POLICY Policy Statement Recycling leader of the State 70% diversion by 2010 Principles & Goals Cost-effective diversion programs Secure, reliable service Minimal exposure to liability Long-term disposal options Ultimate control of waste stream 3 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Progress to date: Tajiguas Landfill Expansion Project Recycling Programs at City Facilities & Parks Commercial Recycling Programs Recycled-Content Products Public Education and Outreach Residential Recycling Programs 4 REGIONAL COOPERATION Multi-Jurisdictional Solid Waste Task Group Long-term Strategies: Construction and demolition (C&D) recycling Enhanced commercial recycling Regional material recovery facility (MRF) Conversion technology (CT) as alternative to landfilling Long-term disposal options for biosolids 5 SANTA BARBARA'S WASTE STREAM IN 2003 Recyclables 15,000 tpy Greenwaste 25,500 tpy Disposed 96,300 tpy Textured sections represent materials successfully diverted from landfills C&D 50,000 tpy Paper & Cardboard 12% Cans & Bottles 4% Scrap Metal 3% Greenwaste 10% Residual 27% Other 11,000 tpy Estimated Total Generation = 197,800 tons per year Textiles 2% Plastic Bags 4% C&D 9% Wood 5% Electronics 4% Food 19% HHW 1% 6 DIVERSION OPPORTUNITIES Residual 27% Paper & Cardboard 12% Cans & Bottles 4% Scrap Metal 3% Greenwaste 10% Textiles 2% Plastic Bags 4% C&D 9% Wood 5% Electronics 4% Food 19% HHW 1% 7 CURRENT DIVERSION State-certified Diversion Rate: 51% 2,000 tons = 1% Diversion Additional Diversion Needed: 19% 8 DIVERSION OPPORTUNITIES Diversion Opportunities 60,000 55,000 50,000 45,000 Tons Per Year 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 Waste Generation Rate W oo d C & D th er ra p l C ar db oa B ot t le nw as Fo od sc M O ix ed re e ap Sc r M G & Pa p C an er s an d R es id ua te rd et a s l 9 DIVERSION OPPORTUNITIES Diversion Opportunities 60,000 55,000 50,000 45,000 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 C& D te rd nw as Waste Generation Rate Captured by Existing Programs Tons Per Year W oo d he r Bo ttl e Ca rd bo a Fo od sc M Ot ixe Gr ee Sc r ap M & Pa p Ca n er s an d Re s d id ua et a ra p l s l 10 DIVERSION OPPORTUNITIES Diversion Opportunities 60,000 55,000 50,000 45,000 Tons Per Year Waste Generation Rate Remaining Divertible Fraction Captured by Existing Programs 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 W oo d C & D th er ra p l te s C ar db oa B ot t le nw as Fo od sc M O ix ed re e ap Sc r M G & Pa p C an er s an d R es id ua rd et a l 11 MOVING FORWARD Low-Hanging Fruit Cost-Effective Programs Building on Success of Other Jurisdictions' Efforts Working with Regional Partners 12 Tons Per Year C &D 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 O 0 M an d .C om 15,000 rd in a nc e ln g 6,000 Sc ho o lR ec yc lin g 2,000 Re c yc C ity Fa c ca l M R F 6,000 Lo ili t ie s R ec yc lin g 500 Fo od s cr ap R ec ov 5,000 W as te A G en 5-Year Increase in Diversion 2,000 5,000 3,000 1,000 700 MAXIMIZING DIVERSION er y er dd at io iti n on R al U at ns e G ch re en ld w H as au te li n g Pe R rm R ec at its yc e In lin ce g nt in iv Pu es H bl az ic ar Sp do us ac es W as te M gm t 2,500 0.00% 1.00% 2.00% 3.00% 4.00% 5.00% 6.00% 7.00% 8.00% 13 % Increase CURRENT PROGRAMS In Progress School Recycling (Diversion: 1%, Cost: $40,000) City Facilities Recycling (Diversion: 0.25%, Cost: $20,000) Public Education & Outreach (Cost: $75,000) Uniform Color Containers Space Requirements for Recycling Recycling in Public Spaces (Diversion: 0.5%, Cost: $130,000) 14 IMPLEMENTATION SHORT TERM FISCAL YEARS 2006/2007 C&D Recycling Ordinance Mandatory Commercial Recycling Foodscrap Recovery and Composting Waste Generation Rate Additional Greenwaste Unscheduled Hauling Permits C&D Recycling Facility Support Rate Incentives Waste Stream Optimization Green Purchasing Policy Regional Discussions 15 C&D RECYCLING ORDINANCE (DIVERSION: 7.5%, COST: $60,000) Applies to all construction and demolition projects Requires applicant to recycle project waste at certified recycling facility Includes outreach and public meetings with contractors 16 MANDATORY COMMERCIAL RECYCLING (DIVERSION: 3.0%, COST: $50,000) Requires recycling in commercial sector Requires equal space for recyclables in multi-unit residential and commercial facilities Includes outreach and public meetings with commercial sector 17 PILOT FOODSCRAP RECOVERY & COMPOSTING (DIVERSION: 2.5%, COST: $67,000) Large institutions and restaurants Commitments from Cottage Hospital and Santa Barbara City College Existing composting facility in northern Santa Barbara county If pilot deemed successful - program could be rolled out to commercial and residential customers 18 ANNUAL WASTE GENERATION (DIVERSION: 1%, COST: $50,000) AB 939 requires jurisdictions to measure annual waste generation Opportunity to establish new annual waste generation rate City's waste stream has changed significantly since 1998 Existing waste generation rate does not reflect current diversion efforts 19 IMPLEMENTATION SHORT TERM FISCAL YEARS 2006/2007 Additional Greenwaste (Diversion: 2.5%, Cost: $50,000) - Provides additional greenwaste container to residential customers Unscheduled Hauling Permits - Requires businesses providing unscheduled hauling services to obtain permit C&D Recycling Facility Support - Supports expansion of CIWMB-permitted capacity at MarBorg C&D Recycling Facility 20 IMPLEMENTATION SHORT TERM FISCAL YEARS 2006/2007 Rate Incentives (Diversion: 0.5%) Modifies rate structure to maximize financial incentives to recycle Waste Stream Optimization Considers processing arrangements for City's recyclables Green Purchasing (Cost: $7,000) Compliments City recycling effort through use of recycled products 21 REGIONAL DISCUSSIONS Cost Issues at Tajiguas Landfill Tipping ("dumping") fees Closure/post-closure funds C&D tailings Other closed landfills Revenue from Commingled Recyclables County Program Fee Greenwaste Processing Fees Building Relationships with County and City of Goleta 22 IMPLEMENTATION - MEDIUM TERM (Within Five Years) Local Material Recovery Facility (Diversion: 3.0%, Cost: $60,000) Being studied through MJSWTG Siting is primary challenge Hazardous Waste Management (Diversion: 1.25%) Consider siting new hazardous waste collection center 23 IMPLEMENTATION LONG TERM (Beyond Five Years) Conversion Technology Explores feasibility of conversion technology Beyond five-year time frame of Plan Would not compete for recoverable materials MJSWTG requesting approval of CT principles 24 Implementation Schedule C&D Ordinance Mandatory Commercial Recycling School Recycling Local Material Recovery Facility Foodscrap Recovery Waste Generation Additional Greenwaste Unscheduled Hauling Permits 2005 Summer X Fall Winter 2006 Spring X Summer Fall Winter X X X X X X X X X X X X 25 Implementation Considerations Plan focuses on lower-cost, easy-to-do, practical programs Seventy percent diversion will be target Next steps 26 Strategic Plan Available at: SBrecycles.org 27 Questions / Comments 28 ...
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This note was uploaded on 08/06/2008 for the course ESM 282 taught by Professor Geyer during the Spring '08 term at UCSB.

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