Argumentative Research Essay (1) - Kyle Taylor English 1110...

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Kyle Taylor English 1110 Prof. Warren People concerned with the current healthcare system in Canada 1158 Suggestions for Major Changes to the Current Canadian Healthcare System There is no debate to the matter of required immediate action for policy changes to the current healthcare system in Canada. There are long wait times to see physicians or specialists; long delays in patients being informed about abnormal test results; non-availability of general practitioners with patients visiting emergency departments for conditions that could have been treated by a general practitioner; miscommunication between physicians being able to electronically exchange information with other medical facilities; and miscommunication for patients being unknowledgeable of medical departments and personnel to contact about a condition or treatment (Drummond, 240). However, the type of fundamental change for improving healthcare policy is debatable as to whether deciding upon introducing a two-tier healthcare system or modifying the current strictly public model. Canada is vastly different from countries that have implemented a two-tier system based on political, social, economic, geographic, and demographic factors. Analysis of these factors will argue that the current public healthcare system in Canada can be improved with a system-wide approach before resorting to a two-tier healthcare model. Politically, Canada is a highly decentralized federation that requires collaboration with federal and provincial/territorial governments in all policy developments. The public healthcare system is administered by each of the provinces assisted by federal tax-support. The system is fundamentally based on universal healthcare coverage for all Canadians, as citizens are
considered equal, regardless of financial capabilities. While the policy of minimum coverage for all citizens is upheld, the current system is flawed and inadequate with expensive taxpayer coverage resulting in inefficient delivery of universal healthcare services (Dutt, CBC.ca). Current issues with the healthcare system are politically exacerbated by the view of politicians that the federal government should not be involved in an area that is within the primary constitutional jurisdiction of the provinces. Politicians view healthcare reform as an electoral deterrent that might compromise their political successes (Ibid, 238).

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