Second Midterm Review Notes.Fall 2013 - UNIVERSITY OF...

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U N IV ER SIT Y OF C AL IF OR NI A, L O S A NG EL ES U C L A BERKELEY • DAVIS • IRVINE • LOS ANGELES • MERCED • RIVERSIDE • SAN DIEGO • SAN FRANCISCO SANT A BARBARA SANTA CRUZ SCANDINAVIAN SECTION 212 ROYCE HALL BOX 951537 LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90095-1537 TEL: (310) 825-6828 FAX: (310) 825-9754 1 MEMO TO: STUDENTS OF SCAND 50 FROM: BILL PURDY, TA SUBJECT: SECOND EXAM STUDY GUIDE DATE: DECEMBER 4, 2013 I whipped together some of my notes on texts and films for the second half of the course. Beware, dear reader! This guide is not as complete or useful as the one for the midterm , yet I was helping lots of individual students with questions here and there, and thought I'd put something together for the whole class in the interest of efficiency. Everything but Together is covered here to some extent; I discussed Together a bit following the second day of its screening in class and hopefully you have some notes on this discussion. ATTENTION : I am repeating the caution from the midterm, which is even more pertinent here. The best preparation for this exam is to read the course texts carefully, pay close attention when watching the films in the course, and to take detailed notes of Professor Wen's lectures. If you did these things, you should do well on the exam and have no need of further review materials. In fact, rather than looking at this guide, your time would be much better spent reading and re-reading the course texts and reviewing your lecture notes . Second Exam Format Multiple Choice, Scantron. Also a bluebook essay. Just as with the first exam, in your bluebook you can likely expect to be asked to: Verify quotations from course texts: author, work, significance; Identify important plot elements; Know relevant biographical data on authors;
2 Understand the historical context of the various course texts and times in which the authors lived; Locate themes present in course texts. On your bluebook essays: 1. Respond to Professor Wen's prompt. Answer his question(s) presented in it. 2. Don’t write on a topic you know little about. Stick to what you know well. 3. Summon a powerful main argument and state it clearly early in the paper. Don’t dilly - dally but get to the point. 4. Offer extensive relevant evidence from the course texts, films, and Professor Wen's lecture notes to defend your argument. ********************************************************************** Some Notes on Course Texts and Films in the Second Half of the Course Hour of the Wolf (Ingmar Bergman, filmmaker) If you find this film dense and difficult, you are not alone. Ingmar Bergman himself thought the film had been left incomplete and he was not sure what its meaning was. As he explained, "the difficulty with the picture is that I couldn’t make up my mind who it was about." Bergman finished filming and realized that it was all about Johan, the crazy artist (a painter, specifically), and "to see a man who is already mad become crazier is boring." Bergman then filmed a few of the scenes where Alma (artist's wife) is speaking to the camera to try to make her the focus of the film, if not the main character herself. Bergman mused,

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