Problem set 1-3 narrative

Problem set 1-3 - ESM 260 APPLIED MARINE ECOLOGY WINTER QUARTER 2008 Background for Homework Assignments 1 3 UNRAVELING THE MYSTERY OF THE

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ESM 260 - APPLIED MARINE ECOLOGY WINTER QUARTER 2008 Background for Homework Assignments 1 - 3 UNRAVELING THE MYSTERY OF THE RAROTONGAN LAGOON Ground Rules 1. The narrative below is background for Homework Assignments 1 - 3, which are to be completed in each of the coming 3 weeks. Assignments must be turned in at the start of lecture, with Homework 1 due on 23 January, Homework 2 on 30 January, and Homework 3 on 6 February . 2. The scenario below is largely contrived so looking up real ‘facts’ about the Cook Islands will not be useful; assume the background information below is reality and the data given are accurate estimates of conditions in the Rarotongan and Aitutaki Lagoons. Background Information After receiving the highest score in ESM 260, your name was posted on the global internet (www.envirowhiz.com) as a consultant available to address applied marine ecological issues. You have been contracted by the government of the Cook Islands, a small Polynesian nation in the South Pacific, to help identify and explore possible environmental impacts to the lagoon that encircles the main island of Rarotonga (the name ‘Rarotonga’ comes from how early Polynesian explorers found it, by sailing raro (down) and tonga (to the south) from the island of Raiatea in French Polynesia). [Editors’ note: see attached maps.] The Cook Islands government is concerned that the once pristine Rarotongan Lagoon has been degraded to the point that it may be affecting both local tourism and a primary source of animal protein - coral reef fish. As expressed to you in a letter from the Rarotongan Island Council, “ Instead of visiting beautiful Rarotonga where half of all Cook Islanders live, tourists are now flocking to one of our small atoll islands - Aitutaki - where only 1% of our people reside. We’re told the reason for this is that few corals are left in our Rarotongan Lagoon for tourists to observe by snorkel. This has damaged the local economy of Rarotonga. It was fortuitous that we began large-scale cultivated agriculture on the fertile slopes and coastal plain of Rarotonga earlier this decade. Growing pineapples, coconuts, guava and other tropical fruits in large cultivated areas
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This note was uploaded on 08/06/2008 for the course ESM 260 taught by Professor Lenihan during the Spring '08 term at UCSB.

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Problem set 1-3 - ESM 260 APPLIED MARINE ECOLOGY WINTER QUARTER 2008 Background for Homework Assignments 1 3 UNRAVELING THE MYSTERY OF THE

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