WkstKey-6 - _E1i!lIE_CLAES Chapter 3 I I lie with...

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Unformatted text preview: _...____E1i!lIE__ ._ _.__ _CLAES Chapter 3 I I lie with Tent-Pages rial—Zn 3" sropflttmoe " o Matter and Temperature Match the definition in Column H with the term in Column 1. hhite the letter of the retreat definition in the blunt on the left. Column I Column II T I _h__ 1. kinetic thE'Dl'ji of matter a. water vapor _‘l 2. plasma b. state of matter with no definite shape but with definite . volume 1 3- Cfi'fitfllfi c. solid which is not made of crystals V 4_ “Ed d. state of matter that has no definite shape and no defir _ :- nite volume -—-l;-—' ' "amorphous material 1:. Matter expands when it gets hotter and contracts when : E 5 it cools. __ f. state of matter with definite shape and definite volume *5“ 5" thermal “PM“ g. water in the solid state _i3_ 3. liquid 11. Tiny particles in motion make up all mather. _Lflgas i. particles arranged in repeating geometric patterns 43‘ 1“. ice j gaslilte mixture of charged particles Use the words in the box infill in the blanks. In solids. puficks move back and forth, but do not charlge t'k'fii‘llttil'l . Different kinds of solids have if ll bpfiflr? of different shapes. Particles in a liquid have more erlergj,»r than do solid particles. Liquid particles can ‘3}; “HQ-lit: over and around each other. Because of this kind of particle motionr liquids are able to ' ' ,' i I f :a lied Because particles of a liquid are very close to one another. a liquid has a definite does not have a definite a'ioflo’éuf or volume- The most common form of matter in die imiireree is 1'; lg oi lli’i . I. . Matter expands when it is HELL-ll - Matter expands because particles ." ' I i l I" apart in all directions. Matter [bitlt’t’fi' when it is cooled. 3" Copnghl It' GlenooetMcGIawqulL a chvlmn ii The Mch-Hil Companies. Inc. __ NAME DATE mass Use with Text Pagu 214—221 _ _ _ _ o Matter and Temperature Answer theflilowfng questions in the blanks provided. Use complete sentences where apmpriate. 1. Wt are the three common states of matter? :3ng b. 1 a .—. gs What is the {with state of matter? I ”@3115: I 2. Complete the foflmving chart describing the shape and volume for the three common states of matter. 3. Use the kinetic theoryr of matter to Explain the behavior of the three common states of matter. 4. In general, when you heat a substance. it expands. This phenomenon is called thermal expansion. Use the kmefic theory:r to explain thermal expansion. Give an example of thermal expansion that you have observed. Copying-rt fl Glencoetuccrew-Hifl, a dim-inn of The McflmiHiil Cmplnifi. Inc. NAME DATE CLASS -. _ . 1-3:; 3:- - ......... : ::._. -- ..- _ __ -: _4W3?°I.rIll-#3.”-..'.fi£fi$kWWWW-~AWWILK a F esh Water: ”*W'eroesofiq Will There Be Enough? _ the!“ Complete fiefiflmeing sentences using woiiisfium pages 222—223 in your textbook. men iookfiir these words in the word search. . QUE-3i! 1 iii lb i" 1. For living things, the most important liquid on Earth is __ . {2 words) ’ iii l lei id I 2. water refers to water that contains such high levels of unwanted materials that it is unacceptable for use. “lit-“MC? 3. chemicals from home use may end up in our water supply if they are not disposed of properly. 4. , herbicides, and pesticides used on farms may enter the groundwater. "l hfi' ' ’ i' 5. The excess heat in water is called pollution. { i '1‘ an; " iii {Sill do 6. If water temperature is changed too much. some 11““ HVE ,. ' in the water will die. ,i' ,. _ .,.-' SAX i. {‘1 M ponies/#1 7i. Cine way to reduce water pollution is to use products that HIE for the . owe 4 ip . . - ir-i iii.- a. are trying to develop better ways to contam and. of indusu'ial wastes. Cnpyflghl e filenciueiMcGraw-Hiii, a dlslslori. of The stem-Mil Companies, Inc. 35 NAHE CLASS Use with Text Pages 224—22? -‘- Chapter 8 Iiil mnnnnilnnn 0 Changes in State ii ll . . ill til Willi-III] M I , a n - enema n a a ya a , n n n unnuuuunennu a I I I H lHlIMHlIIIIIIfl I ill a . n n is u “gonna mil-gun if. 3}. HI?" HEIIIIIEIIIIH Across Down 3.Thestate of a material dependsonthis. Ltochangefromsolidtoliquid 5.:hangeofasoliddirectlytoagas Zenerg neededtochangeamaterialfrom 9. When' ICE melts the particles of solid water _energy. Iii. gaseous water 13. energy needed to change solid to liquid (3 words] 15. change of a liquid to gas below the boil— ing point 16. has definite volume but no definite shape 1?. The kinetic energy of a substance is the kinetic energy of its particles. 15.toehangefromaliquidtoagasattem— perahnes above most! normal to the liq- uid state 19. process that occurs during boiling a material from liqui to gas [3 words) eocnus whenagascoolsandchangestoa liquid 6. Liquids have a definite volume and 'i". a unit of heat 3». no definite shape. no definite volume 11. theory used to explain changes of state 11 has a definite volume and shape 14. determined by motitm and spacing of particles 36 wemumHn-mummmlmm. MAME _ . Dfiil'E CLASS Che pter B I II Use with Text. Pagfi 223—233 Lise tie wards in the Box infill in the Blasts. constantly volume particles {Charles’s Gases in Earth’s atmosphere exert r it" "’ ' 1' on everything According to the 14 Ii‘fil {I : theory, the particles of a gas are time gas particles hit sometl'iing and bounce off, they axert a tin}: force. ssure is this amount of li'u'fl' exerted per unitofarea.Airpressure at sea level is 101.3 The amount of force exerted by a gas depends on the 311:3; of its container. l . $23,! l5 2 law states that if a sample of gas is kept at constant fig" '1 1'3: 1131'de , decreasing the volume will Hi Hit; '3 the pressure the gas exerts. If you increase the volume, the pressure will {'1 Heidi . According to the kinetic theory, it you do not change the amotmt of gas or its temperature but fllflltfigfi‘ thesize ofthecontainenthepartioleswillstrikethewalls more often and the pressure will rise. 1When the size of the container is 15651153? "I- . the pres— sure is smaller because the Jails-"ll ' it “'3ch hit the walls less often. According to l the H, l *2 law, if a sample of gas is kept at constant ill-1' gig-N11; mevolumemcreasesifthetemperahireis H'Ii'fiiifi air-f Charles's measurements suggested that the h'b' ll” Hf. - of a gas would become zero at a temperature of —2?3 “C. The temperature -2?3 “C is called 1’ 3'5" '1' Lilli- zero. All A "J gases become ll {I t» when cooled to their I - - J E? points. moving Every Cflpjl'l'lght Q GmcoeiMch-mhhi‘lfll. at Milan DI The McGImv-I-lil CEITIZHFIlESI Inc. 3? NAME DIME CLASS '-. lChapter 8 I I I I I I Lise with Test-ages 234—239 J] Match the definitions in Column II with the isms in Column I. Write the letter of the correct definition in the blank an the left. Column I Column II ‘D 'l. fluid a. the ability of a fluid to exert an upward force on an obiect immersed in it _':-L 3. pressure c. Pressure app lied to a fluid' is transmitted tmchanged l rhymes 1mg? _L]‘_ 5- Bernoulli’s principle e. The buoyant force on an obEd In a fluid 15 equal to { E 6. b o the weight of the fluid dispa oed by the object ' u M f. ates onPascal’s ci 1e ope: li’l'il'l P —C_— 7"- Pascal's principle 3. As the velocity of_a fluid harreases. the pressure Us: the m in s»: is: refill s: the blanks. '9do by m flmd decreases’ Bernoulli's ll.rcl'limedesr less faster farther floats hydraulic piston buoyant force pressure areas sinks 1qule comlected Pascal’s upward Theatnountof l‘l‘ i'r" ~-*“II’E determineswhetheranobjectwilisinkorfloat in a fluid. s the buoyant force is less than an object’s weight, the object 73: J ll“)? . If the buoyant foroe equals an object's weight. the object -- l (gel ‘1) L Alf-l], with": principlecanbeusedtoexplainfltebuoyantforceonanobject submerged in a fluid. ‘ {r .' '1 ' I lifts that multiply forces use 3 Kill In principle. In a hydraulic lift, a —L-%u-il— is placedinhvo E. ltlt’t’llfi’l cylinders. Eachcylinderhasa ‘3'} “La-l1”: r] that ran move up and down. Also. the cylinders have different u'oss sectional sf' '0 (If: 1' . In this devise, the {2'1 fol-g “L. on each pistonwillbethesame. Hotveventl‘teforcewillbegreaheronthepistoawifltlargerarea. t L:-L"n llLI'l-tlll’ .L-J principleexplainswhyapitchedbaseballcurvesandhowaie planes fly. Air travels a“ :lw’ over the top of the wing than over the bottom.1hus,ttleairtravds iii-Slit overthetopofthewingthanoverthe bottom. Pressure above the wing is [If 5'1: than pressure below it. There is net '5 A. Pig it} If f: l foroe on the wing. 35 WHMMWI, advin'm fl'l'heh'lcfirlw-Hil (Sung-1B, Inc. Port A. Vocabulary Review Soles tliefillawiag crossword puzzle using the clues protected. 1 ongommnmn ufinmnm fimaummmnmmmmenmm Across 1. Water that contains such high levels of 12. changing of a liquid to a gas gradually,Ir at unwanted materials that it is tmacceptable temperatures below the boiling point for drinking is . . 13. repeating geometric arrangement of the 2. gaslilce mixture of positively and nega— particles in a solid “313' Charged Pal-mes 15. Solid, liquid, gas, and plasma are the 4. lav.Ir which states that if the volume of a of matter. container of gas is decreased, the pressure of the gas will increase provided the tem— 16' SI unit '31: pressure PflatU-I'E does “Gt change (2 Wfll‘dfil 1?. person who stated that pressure exerted by 5. The buoyant force on an object in a fluid is fiflgd decreases as the Vde 0f the equal to the weight of the fluid displaced ”'1 1mg b? the 0'31““ —--— principle. 15. state of water at 25°C 1 The amount Df Effigy needed if“ ‘3ng a 19. refers to matter expanding as it gets hotter “FE-“Ed from 3 liquid to a 335 15 the heat and contracting when it coolsflwords} o . Copyright o Glemoelh'lcflramHili, a division- ot The McCraw-Hlll Commit-s, Inc. 19 NAME _ DATE cuss Chapter 8- Review (continued) 6 P4 Down 1. Pressures plied to a fluid is transmitted 3. determines whether an object will sink or changed’ throughout the fluid [2 words]. float in a fluid {2 words} 2. amount of force exerted per unit area 9. changing of a gas to a liquid 3. Amount of energy it takes to change a 1i]. physical state of ice material from a solid to a liquid is the heat of . 11. The volume of a gas increases with increasing temperature provided the 6. The idea that matter is made up of tin};r pressure does not change: law. particles diet are in constant motion is the theory of matter. 14. state of water vapor Part B. Concept Review Match each theory, principie, critter in Column H with its description in Column 1'. Write the fetter of the correct term at the tent at the Left. Column I Column II D 1. All matter is made of small particles that are in motion. a. Boyle’s law E 2. If the volume of a container of gas is decreased. the pree h. Bemoulli’s principle sure on the gas will increase if the temperature does not _ _ changg c. Pascal’s principle E 3, The volume of a gas increases with increasing tempera~ ‘1- kinetic theory ofrrtatter tore provided the pressure does not change. It. Charles’s law i 4. Thebuoyant forceonanobjectinafluidisequaltothe . , . . weight of the fluid the object displaces. f- mmfi PWCIPIE Q2 5. Pressure applied to a fluid is transmitted unchanged throughout the fluid. i 3 6. As the velocityr of a fluid increases, the pressure exerted by the fluid decreases. Answer inefaiiawt'ng questions on the fines pretended. '1'. Identify three wajvs you use fresh water each day. is h. substances that are p luting fresh water supplies 5 [2 hi £313.: 15% ! Eidentifytl‘T-e .. w H"? I'ilutfi 'i .‘iuWS 9. 1il'iihtitcanyoudotoreducewaterpollution? cf 'I __J‘i’T‘l 1"i ' Eff“ l- 1[II. Howaresdentists dealing with water pollution? 1"]... I {if .I" tutti} t it st it Hi. int-J. in i / -... ~— . tit-ti. ji- 2‘“ Copyright 9 GImooeiMchw—I—iili, a division otThe Mcfimvr-Hil Cotnpania, Inc. NAME DATE CLASS Chapter 3 Use wtth Text Page: 222+223 0 Fresh Water: Will There Be Enough? l‘lfi'ife‘ definitions for thefalloufiug terms in the space provided. 1. fresh water 1 polluted water 3. thermal pollution Am»!!! the following question on the lines prodded. 4. In what ways can groundwater be polluted by farms? 5. What can you do u::la.il'_l,Ir in your own life to save water and reduoe water pollution? 6. Using Table 3-1 in your textbook, explain Why self—service car washes are permitted to eta},-r open when flit},r officials forbid home car washing because of a drought? Copyright E.- GlentoEIMcGrmv-Hili. a Mien of The McCrawHIII (memes. In: 35 DATE (ILA-55 Chapter 8- Lise witl'l Test Page: art—22? 0 Changes in State Look carefully at the graph. it ans dreamfmm the date reflected when a substance was heated at a rmtstant rate. To heat at a constant rate means to add heat steely as time passes. Lise the graph to complete the paragraphs thatfiillotu. Temperature 11°C} o1 2' i 4 s a El" s s lei-11213'1'4't5'16 Time {min Utes} At the start of observations, Point A the substance exists in the EL state The tentr perature at this point is _D:CL. As energy is M the temperature of the substance rises at a constant rate for two minutes. At Point B, the temperature is L, and the soiid begins to HEEL The temperature remains constant until lite change from solid to I L is complete. It has talceri three minutes to add enough rgy a: melt the solid completely. From Point C to Point D, the substanoe is in the I ' ' state. Its temperature rises at a constant rate to M. The temperature remains constant while the liquid changes to a _3fllh_. At Point E, the substance exists as a _%L Its temperature rises C M as energy is added. Wl-ten the gaseous substance is allowed to cool it “1E0 EC energy The cooling Curve will be the reverse of the warming Curve. Energy will be ased as the su tanee changes from a 48m__MaJlCE[Ld_andalsofioma‘LLlEUL—toa energy released during condensation will be the same as the amount . The amount of during vaporization. Copyrig'lt fl CIerrLoechani-EIL a division of The McGraw-I-ill Companifi, Int. 36 NAME DATE CLASS .- Chapter It Use with at Page 234—240 4.- Uses of Fluids Determine whether the italicized term makes each statement true orfnise. 1}” the statement is true. write the word true” in the blank. ifine statement is immrect, write in the blank the teen that makes the statement tree. F r33 1. A fluid is a liquid or a solid. DID. lei}; 31ml 1. Buoyancy' is the ability of a fluid to exert a downward force on an object immersed' 111 it. lffi jhfi'l 3. If the buoyant force on an object is greater than the weight of the object. the object will sink. 1‘qu 4. The buoyant force on an object in a fluid is ease! to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. . ll. Em; 63‘ 5». Archimedes’ principle states that pressure applied to a fluid is transmitted unchanged throughout the fluid. {1.3135 3555‘: 6. As the 1I.I'eloi:it'3.t of a fluid increases. the pressure exerted by the fluid incretses. ‘l TILE 'F. The Venturi effect describes how fluids flowfester when forced to flow through narrow spaces. Answer thefiiiotcing questions on the lines provided. 8. A hydraulic machine can he used to lift extremely heavy objects. Why is the fluid in the hydraulic machine a liquid rather than a gas? B ILQ Lil-i {‘12.} ”fl: bfi :5; 1;” H I {if}? . films-1‘s Ic‘s' - ' e ”A . 7‘ l the at 5.. 't .r- I al in -' "ME I la. 4.! .iihfitifit'i 9. A block of wood is floating in water. The weight of the part of the block above water is one- third of the total weight of the block. What is the weight of the water displaced by the block of wood? Explain your answerinterms of i'uxhirtiedesIr principle I LI Eff; tux IS 6:: it) a. crhi W"- HHUHOl‘filE like his: 6a A title I E"! are time it at"! l fpflmh II.I i til we Iii. Apassengerjetintl'ieairincreasesitsspeed.Doesthedownwardforceofaircmthebopof mewingsmaeaseordeuease?floesmenetfiffingfomeotflwairmflteunngsmdease Copyright fl GWMHH, a division ot'l'he Mchu-Hil Cornpafiu, lnL NAME DIME CLASS p. ::-.:-:-:::-. ---------- --- -_ .. + _______....._::::_5-:-. 2?: Chapter 3 .. H I ' UsevthentPagelefl-Ha . a Behavior of Gases Write the definifinnsfir thefuflowt'flg terms in the spaces pmvlded. 1. Beyle’s law 5&6?) lira |£ #115; anh an: yfllamt mfg} Eoliflfleg J1 ”ta-"16mm" I ‘Hlf In H: {122$ ”OH .1 ' 1b; 61/13”?!le 2.Char1es’slaw ._ 3- Jim '1" lb“ 3 I if} it! I 93.5% ' l‘b’l Explain what will luppen in each of thefillawing cases. 5. If the tentperature remains cmstant, what will happen to the pressure of a gas if you deuease the volume at the emtainer that helds the gas? J C ' i’ ' l 1 6. If the volume of a container of gas remains constant, what will happen to the pressure of a gasifpeuinateasetemperattue? III}: “HEM i U3!“ mm‘fflflg Answer theflllawing queslians regarding temperature. s. cm the Kelvin scale, what is the freezing point of water? 27 3 E B. On the Kelvin scale, what is the boiling point of water? :3 2 5 g 9. On the Celsius scale, what are the freezing and boiling points of water? fl! :O‘Cz bflrl'fl W 6 GimcoelMcGraw-HI. a dlw‘s‘nn a! The maralel Companies. Inc. 3.? ...
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