Brodie et al_PNAS_urban aerosols 2007

Brodie et al_PNAS_urban aerosols 2007 - Urban aerosols...

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Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations Piceno, and Gary L. Andersen Eoin L. Brodie, Todd Z. DeSantis, Jordan P. Moberg Parker, Ingrid X. Zubietta, Yvette M. doi:10.1073/pnas.0608255104 2007;104;299-304; originally published online Dec 20, 2006; PNAS This information is current as of January 2007. Online Information www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/104/1/299 etc., can be found at: High-resolution figures, a citation map, links to PubMed and Google Scholar, Supplementary Material www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/0608255104/DC1 Supplementary material can be found at: References www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/104/1/299#BIBL This article cites 31 articles, 23 of which you can access for free at: www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/104/1/299#otherarticles This article has been cited by other articles: E-mail Alerts . click here at the top right corner of the article or Receive free email alerts when new articles cite this article - sign up in the box www.pnas.org/misc/rightperm.shtml To reproduce this article in part (figures, tables) or in entirety, see: Reprints www.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes:
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Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations Eoin L. Brodie, Todd Z. DeSantis, Jordan P. Moberg Parker, Ingrid X. Zubietta, Yvette M. Piceno, and Gary L. Andersen* Ecology Department, Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Edited by Steven E. Lindow, University of California, Berkeley, CA, and approved November 7, 2006 (received for review September 20, 2006) Considering the importance of its potential implications for human health, agricultural productivity, and ecosystem stability, surpris- ingly little is known regarding the composition or dynamics of the atmosphere’s microbial inhabitants. Using a custom high-density DNA microarray, we detected and monitored bacterial populations in two U.S. cities over 17 weeks. These urban aerosols contained at least 1,800 diverse bacterial types, a richness approaching that of some soil bacterial communities. We also reveal the consistent presence of bacterial families with pathogenic members including environmental relatives of select agents of bioterrorism signifi- cance. Finally, using multivariate regression techniques, we dem- onstrate that temporal and meteorological influences can be stron- ger factors than location in shaping the biological composition of the air we breathe. 16S rRNA ± biosurveillance ± aerobiology ± microarray ± climate change L ow levels of moisture and nutrients combined with high levels of UV radiation make the earth’s atmosphere an extreme environment for microbial life. Little is known regarding the atmospheric microbial composition and how it varies by location or meteorological conditions. Plant canopies for example, are known to be significant sources of bacterial aerosols with upward flux of bacteria positively impacted by temperature and wind speed (1). Aerosols created at the surface of aquatic systems are
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This note was uploaded on 08/06/2008 for the course ESM 219 taught by Professor Holden during the Fall '07 term at UCSB.

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Brodie et al_PNAS_urban aerosols 2007 - Urban aerosols...

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