esm223_06_Other_Reading_EPA_Dynamic_Workplan

esm223_06_Other_Reading_EPA_Dynamic_Workplan - A Guideline...

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A Guideline for Dynamic Workplans and Field Analytics: The Keys to Cost-Effective Site Characterization and Cleanup Prepared by Albert Robbat, Jr. Tufts University, Chemistry Department Center for Field Analytical Studies and Technology Medford, Massachusetts, 02155 tel: 617-627-3474 and fax: 617-627-3443 In cooperation with The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region I Office of Site Remediation and Restoration and Office of Environmental Measurement and Evaluation 90 Canal Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02203 Funded by A Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under President Clinton’s Environmental Technology Initiative and with Support from the Northeast Hazardous Substance Research Center An Environmental Protection Agency Research Center for Federal Regions I & II
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i Table Of Contents Tables and Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii 1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Dynamic Workplans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2 Factors to be Considered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 Dynamic Workplan Guideline: Purpose and Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3.0 Dynamic Workplan Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.1 Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4.0 Introduction to Field Analytics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 4.1 Field Measurement and Contaminants of Concern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 4.2 Field AnalyticalTechniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 4.3 Sample Throughput Rates and Analytical Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 4.4 Site or Facility Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 4.5 Quality Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 5.0 Dynamic versus Traditional Hazardous Waste Site Investigation and Cleanup Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Appendix - Field Analysis Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
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ii Tables and Figures List of Tables Page Table 1. Number of Site and QC Samples Analyzed per Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Table 2. Comparison of Field Technologies for PCBs and PAHs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Table 3. Field and Laboratory Cost and Data Turnaround Time Comparison . . . . . 24 Table 4. Field Analytical Measurement Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Table 5. Capital Equipment Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Table 6. Annual Operating Expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 List of Figures Figure 1. Traditional Site Investigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Figure 2. Dynamic Workplan Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Figure 3. Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Flow Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Figure 4. Example of Sampling and Analysis Flow Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Figure 5. Data Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
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E. Koglin and L. R. Williams, Trends in Analytical Chemistry, 13, 294-299 (1994). 1 A. Robbat, Jr., Tufts University, Case Study: Dynamic Workplans and Field Analytics: 2 The Keys to Cost-effective Site Investigations, 1997. 1 1.0 Introduction The ability to rapidly assess the disposition of environmental contaminants at purported or existing hazardous waste sites is an essential component of the nation’s environmental restoration program. Each site, whether owned by the public or private sector, must be evaluated to determine whether risk to human health or the environment exists. If the data obtained supports the notion that no risk or an acceptable level of risk exists for the intended land usage then no further action may be required. If, on the other hand, sufficient risk has been determined to warrant a full site characterization, the site investigation effort must delineate the nature, extent, direction, concentration and rate of movement of the contamination along with the physical and chemical site attributes.
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