esm223_08_Hightower-Goldstein

esm223_08_Hightower-Goldstein - Partnerships for...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Partnerships for Energy-Water Research Bob Goldstein Mike Hightower Electric Power Research Institute Sandia National Laboratories Partnerships for Energy-Water Research Bob Goldstein Mike Hightower Electric Power Research Institute Sandia National Laboratories
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Big Picture Big Picture Water is a shared community resource Community social and economic vitality depend on water and electricity availability Demand for both are increasing and are inter-related Water resource management requires broad stakeholder consensus Energy/water sustainability is a real and high priority issue for United States
Background image of page 2
Unfortunately, the most common water management approach noted by Mark Twain in the late 1800’s was : “Whiskey is for drinking, water is for fighting over” Water management should follow more traditional philosophies: Agua es vida – water is life”, and Native American – “seven generations” Water resource management has multiple stakeholders including energy and “energy export is water export” Water is a resource that should be shared and managed sustainably Water is a resource that should be shared and managed sustainably
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Energy and Water are … Inextricably linked Water for Energy and Energy for Water Energy and Water are … Inextricably linked Water for Energy and Energy for Water Energy and power production requires water: Thermoelectric cooling • Hydropower • Energy minerals extraction / mining • Fuel Production (fossil fuels, H 2 , biofuels/ethanol) • Emission controls Water production, processing, distribution, and end-use requires energy: • Pumping • Conveyance and Transport • Treatment • Use conditioning • Surface and Ground water
Background image of page 4
Major Water Stakeholders in the U.S. and Water Use Trends Major Water Stakeholders in the U.S. and Water Use Trends [USGS, Hutson-2004]
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Surface and Ground Water Availability Surface and Ground Water Availability Little increase in surface water storage capacity since 1980 Emerging concerns over climate impacts on surface water supplies Many major aquifers seeing reductions in water quality, yield and availability This is forcing reductions in ground water pumping
Background image of page 6
Examples of Recent Energy Plants with Water-related Permitting Issues Examples of Recent Energy Plants with Water-related Permitting Issues
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2003 Heat Wave Impact on French Generation System 2003 Heat Wave Impact on French Generation System Loss of 7 to 15% of nuclear generation capacity for 5 weeks
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

esm223_08_Hightower-Goldstein - Partnerships for...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online