Lab_4_Worksheets - Name Lab 4 Rocks Geologists use...

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Name: _______________________________________ Lab 4: Rocks Geologists use composition and textures to classify rocks. Different rocks form under different conditions, giving us an opportunity to piece together the ancient landscape (sedimentary rocks) and plate tectonic settings (metamorphic rocks) of the ancient Earth. This lab builds on the minerals lab (Lab #3) as students will apply what they learned in that lab to help identify new rocks. Objectives: When you have completed this lab you should be able to: 1. Explain the differences between crystalline and clastic rocks. 2. Describe how the character of grains change as they are moved further from their source. 3. Identify common types of sedimentary rocks: conglomerate, sandstone, mudstone (shale), limestone, coal, and rock salt. 4. Identify some minerals in sedimentary rocks, especially quartz, feldspar, clay, calcite, and halite. 5. Identify common types of metamorphic rocks and their characteristic textures: quartzite, marble, slate, phyllite, schist, and gneiss. 6. Examine an igneous rock and determine whether it (a) crystallized slowly deep underground or (b) came out of a volcano or fissure and crystallized quickly on the Earth's surface. 7. Identify six common types of igneous rocks. Materials: One rock ID kit Various labeled sedimentary rock samples in boxes Mineral identification keys Dilute acid Each group will have a box with 15 compartments containing various rocks. The compartments are numbered as follows: Back of box (with hinges) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Front of Box
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NC State University: MEA 110 Lab 4: Rocks 2 Part I: Introduction to Classifying Rocks (5 points) All rocks can be put into one of three fundamentally different rock types: igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic. This week, we will learn how geologists classify and name these different rocks. Your job is to develop a systematic way of differentiating and classifying between the 15 rocks in your identification kit. Six of these rocks are igneous, four sedimentary, and five are metamorphic. Use any characteristics that seem logical and appropriate to develop a dichotomous key that can be used to separate and identify the rocks by sample number. A simple example is given below for classifying organisms. Draw your key with the answers (sample numbers) in the space below. In order to test your keys efficiency and reliability, draw your key on a large post-it note, leaving empty boxes where the rock sample numbers should go. Trade your key and identification kit with another group. You will try to follow their key and place the sample numbers in the correct boxes. When you are done, check with the group to determine if you placed the samples in the correct place.
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NC State University: MEA 110 Lab 4: Rocks 3 Part II: Classifying Igneous Rocks Igneous rocks are classified based on grain size (texture) and color (indicator of composition).
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