Lecture6

Lecture6 - IE 495 Lecture 6 September 14, 2000 Reading for...

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Unformatted text preview: IE 495 Lecture 6 September 14, 2000 Reading for This Lecture Primary Paper by Kumar and Gupta Paper by Gustafson Secondary Roosta, Chapter 5 Analyzing Parallel Algorithms Parallel Systems A parallel system is a parallel algorithm plus a specified parallel architecture. Unlike sequential algorithms, parallel algorithms cannot be analyzed very well in isolation. One of our primary measures of goodness of a parallel system will be its scalability . Scalability is the ability of a parallel system to take advantage of increased computing resources (primarily more processors). Scalability Example Which is better? 1 2 4 8 Algorithm A Algorithm B t log 2 scale 1 2 4 8 t log 2 scale p p Terms and Notations Sequential Runtime T 1 Sequential Fraction s Parallel Fraction p = 1 - s Parallel Runtime T N Cost C = NT N Parallel Overhead T o = C - T 1 Speedup S N = T 1 / T N Efficiency E = S N / N Definitions and Assumptions The sequential running time is usually taken to be the...
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Lecture6 - IE 495 Lecture 6 September 14, 2000 Reading for...

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