Lecture20 - IE 495 Lecture 20 November 9, 2000 Reading for...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: IE 495 Lecture 20 November 9, 2000 Reading for This Lecture Primary ¡ Miller and Boxer, Pages 124-128 ¡ Forsythe and Mohler, Sections 1 and 2 Numerical Algorithms Numerical Analysis So far, we have looked primarily at algorithms for discrete problems. Now we will consider problems from continuous mathematics. Numerical analysis is the study of algorithms for these problems. The main difference between the two areas is that in continuous mathematics, numbers must be approximated in general. Problems and Algorithms A problem is a map from f: X → Y , where X and Y are normed vector spaces. A numerical algorithm is a procedure which calculates F(x) ¡ Y , an approximation of f(x) . A numerical algorithm does not necessatily have to be finite. Some algorithms converge (hopefully quickly) to the true solution "in the limit". Conditioning A problem is well-conditioned if x ′ ≈ x ⇒ f(x ′ ) ≈ f(x) ....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 08/06/2008 for the course IE 495 taught by Professor Linderoth during the Fall '08 term at Lehigh University .

Page1 / 14

Lecture20 - IE 495 Lecture 20 November 9, 2000 Reading for...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online