Lecture2 - IE 495 Lecture 2 August 31, 2000 Reading for...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: IE 495 Lecture 2 August 31, 2000 Reading for this lecture Primary ¡ Miller and Boxer, Chapter 5 ¡ Aho, Hopcroft, and Ullman, Chapter 1 ¡ Fountain, Chapter 4 Secondary ¡ Roosta, Chapter 2 ¡ Cosnard and Trystram, Chapters 4 Interconnection Networks Aside: Introduction to Graphs A graph G = (V, E) is defined by two sets, a finite, nonempty set V of vertices (or nodes) and a set E ⊆ V × V of edges . Example: A road network. The edges can be either ordered pairs or unordered pairs. If the edges are ordered pairs, then they are usually called arcs and the graph is called a directed graph . Otherwise, the graph is called undirected. See AHU, Section 2.3 (Undirected) Graph Terms Vertices u and v are endpoints of the edge (u, v) . We say an edge e = (u, v) is incident to its endpoints. Two vertices u and v are adjacent if (u, v) ∈ E . The degree of a vertex is the number of edges incident to it (equivalently, the number of vertices adjacent to it)....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 08/06/2008 for the course IE 495 taught by Professor Linderoth during the Fall '08 term at Lehigh University .

Page1 / 21

Lecture2 - IE 495 Lecture 2 August 31, 2000 Reading for...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online