phenomenon_paper_update - Running Head CLEFT LIP AND PALATE...

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Running Head: CLEFT LIP AND PALATE 1 Cleft Lip and Palate There is an extremely high number of deformities a child could be born with. From webbed feet to hydrocephalus, a cleft lip and palate is one of the most common. This can be a difficult deformity to try to cope with, but by understanding what a cleft lip and palate is, the risks associated, possible complications, and expected outcomes, it can help families to feel more comfortable and confident about living with the condition. Description of Cleft Lip and Palate According to Pillitteri (2014), the normal formation of the nasal processes occurs between the weeks five and eight during pregnancy. If the fusion of either the upper lip fails to occur, it is called a cleft lip. The fusion will no longer take place after this time, and the child will be born with a deviation in their lip. This can occur unilaterally or bilaterally (Pillitteri, 2014). A few weeks later, during weeks nine and twelve, the closure of the palatal process occurs. If fusion of the palate does not occur and there is a hole in the roof of the mouth, this is called a cleft palate. The cleft in the lip and palate do not always have to occur together, and just one or the other may be deviated. Lindberg and Berglund (2014) state that an estimated 120 children per 1000 live births are born with the deformity. It has shown to be more prevalent in boys than in girls, as well as having a higher incidence in the Asian population (Pillitteri, 2014). It is believed that the deformity is caused by “the transmission of multiple genes added by teratogenic factors present during weeks five and eight of intrauterine life” (Pillitteri, 2014). Some things, such as maternal smoking or binge drinking, stress, viral infections, hyperthermia, certain seizure medications, and maternal obesity have been found to be factors that cause the cleft lip and palate. It is believed that folic acid deficiency may also be connected with the incomplete closure of the anterior midline (Pillitteri, 2014). Lupo, Danysh, Symanski, Langlois,
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CLEFT LIP AND PALATE 2
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