Lecture7 - Integer Programming IE418 Lecture 7 Dr. Ted...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Integer Programming IE418 Lecture 7 Dr. Ted Ralphs
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
IE418 Lecture 7 1 Reading for This Lecture Wolsey Chapter 3 Nemhauser and Wolsey Sections I.6.1, III.1.1-III.1.3
Background image of page 2
IE418 Lecture 7 2 When is an IP Easy to Solve? We will consider an IP to be “ easy ” when we can solve all instances of it efficiently, i.e., in polynomial time. We will see that there are a number of properties that indicate an IP is easy: 1. Existence of an efficient optimization algorithm , 2. Existence of an efficient separation algorithm , 3. Existence of a complete description of the convex hull of integer solutions, 4. Existence of a certificate of optimality , or 5. Existence of a strong dual problem. We will see that under certain conditions, Properties 1 and 2 are equivalent. Property 3 implies all other properties if the description is small.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
IE418 Lecture 7 3 The Ellipsoid Algorithm The ellipsoid algorithm is an algorithm for solving linear programs. The implementation requires a subroutine for solving the
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/06/2008 for the course IE 418 taught by Professor Ralphs during the Spring '08 term at Lehigh University .

Page1 / 8

Lecture7 - Integer Programming IE418 Lecture 7 Dr. Ted...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online