Lab10 - IE 170 Laboratory 10: Public Key Cryptography Dr....

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Unformatted text preview: IE 170 Laboratory 10: Public Key Cryptography Dr. T.K. Ralphs Due April 24, 2006 1 Laboratory Description and Procedures 1.1 Learning Objectives You should be able to do the following after completing this laboratory. 1. Understand the basic principles of public key cryptography. 2. Understand how the RSA encryption algorithms work. 3. Undertand how to produce a digital signature. 4. Understand the limitations of the built-in data types for implementing encryption algorithms. 5. Understand the number theoretic algorithms underlying cryptographic methods. 1.2 Key Words You should be able to define the following key words after completing this laboratory. 1. Public/private key 2. RSA encryption 3. Digital signature 4. Modular arithmetic 5. Euclidean algorithm 1.3 Scenario In this lab, you are to implement a protocol for communicating securely over the Internet. The ability to conduct business over the Internet in a secure fashion is crucial to the continued growth of e-commerce and other applications in which private data must be transmitted over public parts of the network. The security of these transactions is provided through the use of encryption. As use of the Internet for conducting business has grown, these techniques have come into wide use and have become increasingly sophisticated. Although transmitting data securely over an electronic network is obviously a relatively new concept, cryptography has been used for secure transmission of data for at least two thousand years. Julius Caesar is credited as one of the first users of this technology. Early coding schemes, how- ever, required a prearrangement between the sender and the receiver since encryption/decryption 1 required a shared key that had to be known a priori to both parties. This is obviously not desriable for conducting business transactions since the prior arrangement would have to be done off the network by US mail or by phone to ensure security....
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Lab10 - IE 170 Laboratory 10: Public Key Cryptography Dr....

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