MUSC171 - October 6 2015 Big Band Swing In the Mood Glenn...

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October 6, 2015 Big Band Swing “In the Mood” Glenn Miller - trumpets, trombone, saxes, rhythm section- drums guitar bass keyboard Big band- big cities (39-45)- World War 2 - dances- cities- morale, social life, forget about war Vocalists- Frank Sinatra Rise of the solo singers - strike vocalists could stid? records (1942) - vocalists- union: AFTRA American Federation of Television and Radio Artists - solo singer celebrity - technology of the mic created “crooners” and a new celebrity industry - knowable Duke Ellington 1899-1974 , 1940 Congo Brava dance of Afro-Cuban origin largely notated with some improvisation I -4 A- 20 (16 trombone solo, 4 clarinet bridge) A- 20 (16 trombone solo & brass riffs, 4 clarinet bridge) B- 8 (clarinet solo, brass back) Bridge- 6 (“tutti”, “everyone”) C- 40 (tenor sax solo) Br.- 8, muted trumpets A- 20 (16 saxes and muted trumpet improve, 4) D- 22 tutti Br. 4 A- 20 trombone solo Big Band 1) more complex lengths in its sections 2) some improv.- hybrid of African American and Euro American During WWII, 29/43 albums sold were Big Band After WWII, the Big Band disappears. Why? 1) People moving away from the cities, too expensive 2) Solo artist- Frank Sinatra (record labels pushing solo singers because it was easier to make money off a 1 person vs. 20) 3) Women left jobs and went home, no one for men to dance with Big Band both black and white bands performing
1940s-50 (R&B) Reason for popularity: Decline of big band, local radio stations, car radios, DJs refuse to perpetuate racisms - music by African American artists with 1949 “race” music - smaller big band- Jump Band- 1 person per part Louis Jordan - race divided on radio - 1951 white DJs playing black artists - DJ in Cleveland, Alan Fried (insisting on playing both white and black artists on same radio station, why things changed) - youth culture - cars, car radios for the first time a lot of young white youth are listening to black artists Rhythm & Blues (R&B) - genre of music popular between 1945-1960 (post war & pre-Beatles) clear R&B sound Louis Jordan- “The Father of Rhythm and Blues” Riff: 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + x x x Choo Choo Ch’Boogie I- 12 (4, 4, 4 train sounds) V- 12 muted trumpet +4 + (riff) Call and response C- 8 radio friendly Euro-American 8mm Piano solo- 12 boogie woogie V- 12 call and response C- 8 Alto sax solo- 20 (12 call & response riff, 8 improv) V- 12 riff, call and reponse C- 8 (6,2 stop time “take me right back to the track Jack”) Saxes- 8 (6,2 stop time) T 1+ Features: improv, arranged music, use of riffs, shuffle 8s, stop time Stop time- important African-American features goes into rock and roll Like the time stops but some part still keeps going Oct. 8, 2015 (A.A.- African American) Riff-A.A. Stop time- A.A. Clearly enunciated- Euro-American - solos- hybrid written & improvised
Early Rock and Roll - early 1950s R&B + Country = Rock and Roll (Black + White ) coming together Pre Rock and Roll, there were lots of women performers At Rock and Roll, women excluded women were singing country and Tin Pan Alley (more traditional) - with Rock and Roll, women were obliterated from charts - women are now in lyrics- sung about, often referred to as babies

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