Zylberberg - Oranges and Seders - Symbols of Jewish Womens Wrestlings - Oranges and Seders Symbols of Jewish Women's Wrestlings Author(s Sonia

Zylberberg - Oranges and Seders - Symbols of Jewish Womens Wrestlings

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Oranges and Seders: Symbols of Jewish Women's WrestlingsAuthor(s): Sonia ZylberbergSource: Nashim: A Journal of Jewish Women's Studies & Gender Issues,No. 5, Feeding anIdentity: Gender, Food, and Survival (Fall, 5763/2002), pp. 148-171Published by: Indiana University PressStable URL: Accessed: 27-01-2017 21:58 UTCREFERENCES Linked references are available on JSTOR for this article: You may need to log in to JSTOR to access the linked references.JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusteddigital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information aboutJSTOR, please contact [email protected]Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available atIndiana University Pressis collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Nashim: AJournal of Jewish Women's Studies & Gender IssuesThis content downloaded from 134.74.20.15 on Fri, 27 Jan 2017 21:58:28 UTCAll use subject to
ORANGES AND SEDERS:SYMBOLS OF JEWISH WOMEN'S WRESTLINGSSonia ZylberbergThe house is clean, swept of all leaven, and ready for Passover. The familymembers are assembled, dressed in their holiday best, waiting for the eveningto begin. The table is set with the cherished tablecloth and holiday dishes. Onthe table are the ritual objects and foods: Haggadahs, matzas, and wine;bowls of salt water and vinegar; in the center of the table is the Seder platewith its complement of symbolic foods: parsley (karpas), bitter herbs (maror),shank bone (zeroa), egg (beitzah), haroset, and an orange.An orange?The orange is out of place. It does not appear on the traditional Seder plate;there is no mention of an orange in the traditional Haggadah. Its appearanceis startling, jarring. It calls attention to itself by its unfamiliarity, accentuatedby its brightness, its color, its shape, its smell. It invites questions anddiscussion. What is it doing here?Religious symbols are powerful mechanisms; they are often the conse-quences and tangible results of centuries of religious activities andthoughts. They carry within them traces of these processes and invoke andevoke history and tradition by their very presence. Whether initiated con-sciously and purposefully or not, they often take on a life of their own andevolve over time in unforeseen and unexpected ways. They may functionas reminders of the past or as reminders of the continuous need forreflection and reflexivity. They may become more or less conspicuous withchanging times and conditions. This essay marks the emergence of a newreligious symbol: the orange. Although its future is still unknown, we canbegin the task of chronicling its origins and growth. Even in its as-yet-brief

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