02softEngIntro

02softEngIntro - Why software engineering? Demand for...

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Unformatted text preview: Why software engineering? Demand for software is growing dramatically Software costs are growing per system Many projects have cost overruns Many projects fail altogether Software engineering seeks to find ways to build systems that are on time and within budget Demand for larger software systems What growth pattern do you see in the following? F4 fighter had no digital computer and software (Early 70s). F16A had 50 digital processors and 135 KLOC (Late 70s). F16D had 300 digital processors and 236 KLOC (Late 80s). B-2 has over 200 digital processors and 5000 KLOC. Software components are growing exponentially Software development costs Software costs are increasing as hardware costs continue to decline. Hardware technology has made great advances Simple and well understood tasks are encoded in hardware Least understood tasks are encoded in software Demands of software are growing Size of the software applications is also increasing Hence the software crisis Software costs Hardware costs Time Hardware costs vs. Software costs What can you infer from the graph? State of the practice Estimate Early On Time Delayed Canceled 13,000 6.06% 74.77% 11.83% 7.33% 130,000 1.24% 60.76% 17.67% 20.33% 1,300,000 0.14% 28.03% 23.83% 48.00% 13,000,000 0.00% 13.67% 21.33% 65.00% Source: Patterns of software failures and successes, Capers Jones, 1996 Delays common with mid- to large projects. Majority of the large projects are canceled. What can you infer from this chart? What can you infer from this chart? 10 20 30 40 50 60 Cost overrun Successful Cancelled Source: The Standish Group, 1994 Successful projects (16.2%) - Delivered fully functional on time and on budget....
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02softEngIntro - Why software engineering? Demand for...

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