HIST paper 1 - 1 Janeia Morten HIST 2111 Prof B Wells Primary Source Document Analysis Post American Revolution In the state of Mississippi in

HIST paper 1 - 1 Janeia Morten HIST 2111 Prof B Wells...

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1 Janeia Morten HIST 2111 Prof. B. Wells February 23, 2016 Primary Source Document Analysis: Post American Revolution In the state of Mississippi in particular, many people thought (and still do) was one of the many slave states. During the American Revolution, Mississippi was left in nothing but chaos and misfortune as an economy. On the other hand, there were many petitions being held resulting in many documents to be researched and used as a primary source. Many historians refer to the use of primary documents to interpret the original documents. In an historian’s eye, history is not a science or something you just learn and remember; history is a method, something that you have to not only think about but interpret the things that are not clear (referring to what was said). Within the state of Mississippi, many court/petition records were hand written and saved as a primary document. These certain court cases involved things such as marital issues, selling of slaves, children, property, and legal rights. Even though slaves had natural rights, during this time they were still considered property meaning that they could be sold, used for labor, and passed down through family generations. Throughout this analysis, a few primary sources such as microfilm, books, state papers and colonial records will be used to describe the historical background of blacks between the years of 1775 and 1867. This specific court petition was recorded as a race and slavery petition project. The petition was held in Noxubee County, Mississippi beginning on March 3, 1852, and ending three years later on May 8, 1855. The petitioner(s) included two white males by the name of James D
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