Lecture58-61(2008)

Lecture58-61(2008) - TILLAGE AND SOIL COMPACTION Read...

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Read : Chapter 13, Introduction to Environmental Soil Ph ysics TILLAGE Tilla ge mechanical manipulation of soil---- in agriculture, it is usually restricted to modifying soil conditions for crop production. Soil preparation for crop growth historically has included tillage and in some cases tillage has been excessive. Present concern: intensive soil tillage is expensive , and it promotes soil erosion .-- Soil compaction, either directly or indirectly, associated with tillage. TILLAGE AND SOIL COMPACTION
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Tillage alters soil structure. It is believed to improve water infiltration and retention of rain water. Tillage alters soil porosity (assuming a crust is present), thus allowing a good exchange between soil air with atmospheric air. Tillage should provide proper conditions for seed germination, particularly a good water-to-air balance. Tilled soil offers little resistance to seedling emergence or root penetration. Tillage provides some weed control and incorporation of plant residue. Reasons for Tilla ge
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The rootbed, on the other hand, will be needed throughout the plant growth stages. It is that part of the soil from which the plant obtains water and nutrients. A fine, compact rootbed is not required--and is not desirable because it offers resistance to root growth and low water storage capacity.
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Lecture58-61(2008) - TILLAGE AND SOIL COMPACTION Read...

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