Ch 14(1) - Chapter 14 The Civil War The Secession Crisis...

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Chapter 14: The Civil War
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The Secession Crisis Second Party System collapsed Federal Government had to deal directly with the issue The election of 1860 precipitated the war 2 Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg (The Palma Collection / Getty Images)
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The Withdrawal of the South 3 South Carolina seceded first Confederacy established (February 1861) Seceding states began to seize federal property Efforts to forge a compromise
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The Failure of Compromise 4 Proposal for extend Missouri compromise to the Pacific Crittenden Compromise rejected Lincoln declared that acts to support secession were insurrectionary Civil War-Era Washington (Royalty-Free/CORBIS)
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Fort Sumter 5 Fort Sumter, SC (Royalty-Free/CORBIS) Fort Sumter seized Civil War began on April 1861 Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee and North Carolina seceded from the Union
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The Opposing Sides 6 Northern advantages: Advanced industrial system Transportation system Southern advantages: Local support and commitment Potential intervention of English and French
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The Mobilization of the North 7 The war produced prosperity and economic growth in the North Homestead Act and Morrill Act developed the West National Bank Acts created a new national banking system
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Financing the War in the North Levying taxes Issuing paper currency Borrowing 8
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The Union Army 9 Union and Confederacy had to raise its army from scratch National draft law passed Opposition to draft laws War by Railroad (NARA)
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The Mobilization of the North 10 Bold use of presidential powers Repression of “disloyal” Northerners Increasing opposition to the war Photographers took pictures of the war Lincoln reelected in 1864
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The Politics of Emancipation 11 Disagreements on the issue of slavery among republicans Confiscation Act: Insurrectionary slaves would be considered freed The Emancipation Proclamation signed on January 1863
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The Politics of Emancipation 12 Ex-slave children freed by Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation line up outdoors at Freedmen's Village, a temporary settlement at Alexandria, Virginia, ca. 1863. (Royalty-Free/CORBIS) Emancipation only applied to territories not controlled by the Union Slaves joined the Union Army Thirteenth Amendment approved in 1865.
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African Americans and the Union Cause 13 Growing black enlistment Low status of black soldiers Blacks felt enormous pride in their service African-American Troops (Library of Congress)
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Women, Nursing, and the War 14 Women worked as teachers and nurses Female nurses served in the battlefield National Woman’s Loyal League The U.S. Sanitary Commission (NARA)
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The Mobilization of the South 15 The Confederate States of America created (Feb. 1861)
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  • Fall '16
  • J chism
  • American Civil War, Confederate States of America, Union army

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