class15_emotion - Introduction to Psychology Class 15:...

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Introduction to Psychology Class 15:  Emotion Myers:  379 - 424  July 12, 2006
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Experiment Rate the following pictures on funniness  using the following scale:  1 2 3 4 5 Make sure your pencils are in place … Not funny at  all Very   funny
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Effects of Facial Expressions Strack et al (1988) Artificial smiling vs. frowning (what we just did) caused  differential ratings of funniness of cartoons    Participants who were told to grimace along as they  watched someone being shocked showed more  arousal than the control group
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Definition  “Heart pounding, I ran faster and faster, fearing death,  but somehow hoping I wasn’t going to die.” A response of an organism involving physiological  arousal, expressive behaviors, and usually conscious  experience 
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Function Preparing for action Shaping future behavior Helping us interact more effectively with others
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Basic Emotions 
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Positive  Negative Love     Joy  Anger     Sadness  Fear Fondness Infatuation Bliss Contentment Pride Annoyance Hostility Contempt Jealousy Agony Grief Loneliness Guilt Horror Worry Schadenfreude (German) Hagaii (Japanese)
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Physiology of Emotion
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emotion or cognition? Emotion 
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This note was uploaded on 08/12/2008 for the course PSY 301 taught by Professor Pennebaker during the Summer '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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class15_emotion - Introduction to Psychology Class 15:...

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