class1_knowing - Ultimate consensus that is an outcome of...

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Introduction to Psychology Class 1: Ways of Knowing June 12, 2006
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Define: Psychology It is the scientific study of affect , behavior , and cognition - A ffect (feeling) - B ehavior - C ognition (thought)
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Ways of “Knowing” T enacity A uthority A P riori Method E xperience S cience Tomas, V. (1957). Charles S. Peirce: Essays in the philosophy of science. New York: Liberal Arts Press Reference
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Tenacity An unquestioning faith in the “truth” of some matter Motivated by “an instinctive dislike of an uncertain state of mind” Provides a sense of control Makes one impervious to contrary information Example?
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Authority Sources: Parents, professors, textbooks, expert opinions Good because we cannot all know everything Bad because authority figures may not really be experts Example?
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A priori method Improvement over tenacity and authority
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Unformatted text preview: Ultimate consensus that is an outcome of rational discussion between people with different ideas Based on logic and argument based on prior assumptions Example? Experience Empiricism: learning things through direct observation or experience Subject to subjectivity and biases An aspect of scientific thinking We cannot all experience everything , so it is limited Example? Science Most reliable way to develop a belief Allows us to know “real things whose characteristics are independent of our opinions of them” Scientists rely on all the preceding ways of knowing but this final step is indispensable Example? Scientific Thinking Do opposites really attract? Think of ways to begin scientifically answering this question...
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This note was uploaded on 08/12/2008 for the course PSY 301 taught by Professor Pennebaker during the Summer '07 term at University of Texas.

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class1_knowing - Ultimate consensus that is an outcome of...

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