6BerkeleyHume - : Contiguity, Similarity, Cause and Effect....

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George Berkeley (1685-1753) Follows Locke in claiming that all ideas derive from experience. But if this is true, then mental contents (ideas) are the only things we can be confident really exist (idealism). Esse est percipe (To be is to be perceived.) Rejects corpuscularian philosophy and infinitesmal calculus. Rejects abstract ideas as an oxymoron. Promotes doctrine of association of ideas via contiguity in space and time. Favors an “instrumentalist” philosophy of science. David Hume (1711-1776) Treatise on Human Nature (1738) Carries empiricism to the brink of solipsism (Rejects God, Matter, Mind)
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Laws of Association
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Unformatted text preview: : Contiguity, Similarity, Cause and Effect. But then shows that Causality really reduces to contiguity plus the human psychology of habit and expectancy. Humes fork : Only meaningful statements are statements of empirical fact or statements about relations among ideas (what Kant called analytic statements and what nowadays are called tautologies). The latter include: definitions, logical statements (p or not p), mathematical statements, and other statements that are true by virtue of the meanings of the words contained in them (All widows are women)....
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6BerkeleyHume - : Contiguity, Similarity, Cause and Effect....

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