Memory - Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory...

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Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory Memory
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True or False?? 1. When people go around a circle saying their names, their poorest memories are for what was said by the person just before them. 2. Our experiences are etched on our brain, just as the grooves on a tape receive and retain recorded messages. 3. Although our capacity for storing information is large, we are still limited in the number of permanent memories we can store. 4. The hour before sleep is a good time to commit information to memory.
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Recall vs Recognition Dopey Sniffy Wishful Puffy Dumpy Sneezy Lazy Pop Grumpy Bashful Cheerful Teach Shorty Nifty Happy Doc Wheezy P-Diddy Grouchy Gabby Fearful Sleepy Smiley Jumpy Hopeful Shy Droopy
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The Answers •Research suggests the order, from most likely to least likely recalled is as follows: – Sleepy – Dopey – Grumpy – Sneezy – Happy – Doc – Bashful
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Seven Dwarfs and STM •Now, turn over the sheet and recall the names of the seven dwarfs on the back of the sheet
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Memory Memory –persistence of learning over time via the storage and retrieval of information
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Memory Encoding – the processing of information into the memory system Storage – the retention of encoded information over time Retrieval – process of getting information out of memory
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Ebbinghaus and Memory Systematic and controlled study of memory in laboratory H. Ebbinghaus (1850-1909)
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Ebbinghaus and Memory •Ebbinghaus –Used nonsense syllables: TUV ZOF GEK MONUL WAV FALEM –the more times practiced on Day 1, the fewer repetitions to relearn on Day 2
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Ebbinghaus’ Retention Curve 20 15 10 5 0 8 16 24 32 42 53 64 Time in minutes taken to relearn list on day 2 Number of repetitions of list on day 1
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•Most forgetting occurs right after learning – approx. 50% in first 40 min •Relationship between delay and forgetting not linear Ebbinghaus and Forgetting Curve
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Ebbinghaus and Memory Other important findings –Beneficial effects of distributed practice for repetitions (ie., ‘spacing effect’) –List-length effect
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