12-01-TradeLib

12-01-TradeLib - CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES...

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CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE A PAPER DECEMBER 2005 The Effects of Liberalizing World Agricultural Trade: A Survey CBO © Royalty-free/bxp31212/Brand X Pictures
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The Congress of the United States O Congressional Budget Office CBO The Effects of Liberalizing World Agricultural Trade: A Survey December 2005 A PAPER
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Notes Numbers may not add up to totals because of rounding. In this report, the word “country” includes the European Union. For purposes of international trade policy, the European Union is effectively one country. There is free trade among its members, its members have a common trade policy toward the rest of the world, and the union itself (rather than its individual member countries) is a member of the World Trade Organization.
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Preface A major issue on the agenda of the ongoing Doha Round of multilateral negotiations by members of the World Trade Organization concerns how and to what extent policies that affect agricultural trade should be liberalized. For most of the postwar period, the series of multilateral negotiating rounds under the auspices of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade allowed policies that distort agricultural trade to continue in large part while tariffs and other policies that distort trade in other sectors were progressively reduced or eliminated. The Uruguay Round, which took place from 1986 through 1994, began the liberalization of agri- cultural trade; yet tariffs remain much higher, and the use of subsidies remains much more prevalent, in agriculture than in other goods-producing industries. In August of this year, in response to part of a request by the Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) published a paper that pre- sented statistics on policies around the world that distort agricultural trade. This paper, pre- pared in response to the same request, presents the results of studies that estimate the economic effects of liberalizing those policies. In keeping with CBO’s mandate to provide objective, impartial analysis, this paper makes no recommendations. Bruce Arnold of CBO’s Microeconomic Studies Division prepared this paper under the super- vision of Roger Hitchner, Joseph Kile, and David Moore. (Roger Hitchner has since left CBO.) Paul Burnham, Douglas Hamilton, Gregory Hitz, Arlene Holen, Donald Marron, and Tom Woodward provided comments on a draft of the paper. Outside of CBO, Ron Babula, William Deese, and Roger Corey of the U.S. International Trade Commission, Robert Stern of the University of Michigan, and Mary Burfisher of the U.S. Naval Academy provided com- ments on a lengthier and more detailed paper from which this paper was condensed. (The assistance of external reviewers implies no responsibility for the final product, which rests solely with CBO.) Christine Bogusz edited the paper, and Leah Mazade proofread it. Allan Keaton prepared the paper for publication, and Maureen Costantino designed the cover. Lenny Skutnik printed copies of the paper, and Annette Kalicki and Simone Thomas produced the electronic version for CBO’s Web site (www.cbo.gov).
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This note was uploaded on 08/08/2008 for the course ECON 464 taught by Professor Maria during the Spring '08 term at Wisconsin.

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12-01-TradeLib - CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES...

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