example-Lab1 - Monocular vs Binocular Vision Abstract The...

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Monocular vs. Binocular Vision
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Abstract The following report studied how the eyes react when catching a ball. Specifically, the data focused on two different eye conditions, monocular and binocular. The length of time the eye followed the ball, known as pursuit time, was recorded and analyzed. When using one eye, it was shown that a subject follows the ball with that eye for significantly longer than with two eyes. The length of time from release of the ball to the first saccadic eye movement was also measured and analyzed. The results show no significant difference between the two conditions. Introduction The generalized goal is to understand basic eye movements and brain functions as they occur in everyday experience. Some information is known about the topic, through Land. In Land’s experiments, it was show that persons eyes tend to fixate upon objects relevant to the task. They do not fixate on objects which would be irrelevant to the task, even though such objects may be in the vicinity of the task. Our specific task involved catching a ball, something everyone is familiar with. Land provides us with a general pattern by which people will trace a ball, through his observance of cricket. First, a person watches the hands of the person throwing it. Next, the person saccades down to the point where they are anticipating the ball will bounce (generally). Afterward, they will begin a smooth pursuit of the ball until it is near enough to be hit. Our task worked in much the same way, except instead of hitting the
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ball, they merely caught it. What makes Land’s discovery interesting is in the timing it takes to perform such actions. Because there is a limited time before the ball hits the floor, and because knowing the speed and trajectory of the ball is important for hitting or catching it, it becomes necessary to estimate the location of the bounce before the ball actually gets there. This will provide the hitter/catcher with the largest amount of information vital to hitting or catching the ball. This saccade, however, is not a response to visual stimulus, but rather entirely anticipatory. Land also states that there is a monocular ambiguity which exists about the trajectory and speed of the ball before the bounce point if it is viewed with monocular vision. This is because, he says, a slow ball with a short trajectory will cast the same image on the retina as a fast ball with a long trajectory. Our objective, then, was to examine the difference between monocular and binocular vision in regards to catching a ball. Method Our subjects, all college age males utilized an RIT wearable eye tracker. It consisted of a backpack containing all the recording equipment and a pair of glasses (the rim only). On the right eye, a camera hung just below the eye and was able to record where the eye moved. The camera was in visible sight to the person, although most of there visual field was left unimpaired. Another camera was situated at the side
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of the rim, which would capture what the subject saw in front of him. The eye tracker
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This note was uploaded on 08/12/2008 for the course PSY 341K taught by Professor Gilden during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas.

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example-Lab1 - Monocular vs Binocular Vision Abstract The...

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