global-generational-report-november - NOVEMBER 2015 GLOBAL GENERATIONAL LIFESTYLES How We Live Eat Play Work and Save for Our Futures LIFESTYLES OF THE

global-generational-report-november - NOVEMBER 2015 GLOBAL...

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GLOBAL GENERATIONAL LIFESTYLES How We Live, Eat, Play, Work and Save for Our Futures NOVEMBER 2015
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How much does our age influence how we think, where and what we eat or how we save and spend? Depending on our age, our approach to something as simple as getting up-to-date news or eating out can be drastically different. But today’s consumers are bucking yesterday’s preconceived generational notions. In fact, many older people are embracing a more technology-driven world, and sizeable numbers of younger people are turning to more traditional values. Yet for all of our differences, in many ways, it’s remarkable how similar we are no matter the age. The Nielsen Global Generational Lifestyles Survey polled 30,000 online respondents in 60 countries to better understand how global consumer sentiment differs across life stage. The findings break some myths and reaffirm others. For the purposes of this study, respondents are segmented into five life-stage classifications: The results reveal insights about how consumers around the world live, eat, play, work and save. LIFESTYLES OF THE YOUNG AND THE AGING Generation Z (15-20) Millennials (21-34) Generation X (35-49) Boomers (50-64) Silent Generation (65+)
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LIFESTYLES OF THE YOUNG AND THE AGING OLD MYTHS AND NEW REALITIES WHEN IT COMES TO GETTING THE NEWS, TV and search engine sites have broad appeal for the young and old alike. Not surprisingly, older respondents prefer traditional sources like print and radio. TRADITIONAL VALUES, such as getting married, having children and buying a house are still relevant for many Generation Z and Millennial respondents— even if they aren’t top priorities. YOUNG PEOPLE ARE HIGHLY CONNECTED, but they’re not the only ones distracted by technology. In fact, Baby Boomers are the most likely to admit that their mealtimes are not technology free. IT’S NOT OLDER CONSUMERS (who often have more time and money) eating out most often. Millennials are the most avid out-of-home diners. Nearly six- in-10 eat out at least once a week, and almost one-third say they eat out three times per week or more. TV REMAINS A FAVORITE LEISURE-TIME ACTIVITY among respondents of all ages, but reading is also a top activity—even among Generation Z and Millennial respondents. In fact, more younger respondents selected reading over playing online video games and reviewing social media as a top spare-time activity. JOB LOYALTY MAY BE A THING OF THE PAST. Millennials are roughly two times more likely to leave a job after two years, 1.5 times more likely after five years and half as likely to stay after 10 years, compared to Generation X and Baby Boomer respondents. DEBT IS A FACT OF LIFE for more than four-in-10 respondents of all ages, including more than half of Generation X and Baby Boomer respondents. Older consumers carefully monitor spending and limit purchases, while younger respondents take a longer-term approach.
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  • Fall '15
  • Brad Davis
  • Generation Y, Cultural generations, respondents, Silent Generation, Nielsen Generational Lifestyle, Generational Lifestyle Survey

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