Lab4_Thermal Expansion - CVEN207 Lab#4 Thermal Expansion...

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CVEN207 6/9/16 Lab #4: Thermal Expansion EQUIPMENT INCLUDED: ScienceWorkshop PASPORT 1 Computer-based Thermal Expansion TD-8579A TD-8579A 1 Temperature Sensor CI-6527A PS-2125 1 Rotary Motion Sensor CI-6538 PS-2120 1 Steam Generator TD-8556A TD-8556A NOT INCLUDED, BUT REQUIRED: 1 Computer Interface CI-6400 PS-2001 1 DataStudio Software CI-6870 CI-6870 INTRODUCTION The purpose of this experiment is to find the coefficient of linear expansion for copper, aluminum and brass. A long metal rod is heated with a Steam Generator. The change in length is measured with a Rotary Motion Sensor. The change in temperature is measured with a Temperature Sensor. A close analysis of the data produces the coefficient of linear expansion. THEORY Most materials expand when heated through a temperature range that does not produce a change in phase. The added heat increases the average amplitude of vibration of the atoms in the material, which increases the average separation between the atoms. Suppose an object of length L undergoes a temperature change of magnitude T. If T is reasonably small, the change in length, δ , is generally proportional to L 0 and T. Stated mathematically: δ = L 0 T; where  is called the coefficient of linear expansion for the material. Materials that are not isotropic, such as an asymmetric crystal for example,  can have a different value depending on the axis along which the expansion is measured. The coefficient (  can also vary somewhat with temperature. Therefore, the degree of expansion depends not only on the magnitude of the temperature change, but also on the absolute temperature. In this experiment, you will measure  for copper, aluminum, and brass. Written by Ann Hanks
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CVEN207 6/9/16 These metals are isotropic, so it is necessary to measure  along only one dimension. Also, within the limits of this experiment,  does not vary with temperature. Written by Ann Hanks
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CVEN207 6/9/16 SET-UP for PASPORT Sensors 1. Attach the Rotary Motion Sensor (RMS) to the large end block on the apparatus. Use the black thumb screws to attach the RMS to the holes in the larger of the black end blocks (See Figure 1). Place the pinion onto
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