Course Hero Logo

Psych 305 Week 11 - Psych 305 Week 11 Terry Chapter 10 Try...

Course Hero uses AI to attempt to automatically extract content from documents to surface to you and others so you can study better, e.g., in search results, to enrich docs, and more. This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 4 pages.

Psych 305 Week 11Terry Chapter 10Try to answer the question why do we forget things.oYou didn’t get things into storage in the first place, you have not thought deeply about it.oSomething did get into storage but there is some fault that has occurred. This faultis because everything we talk about has physical basis, neurons are being created, any physical property is decaying, it is not permanent, the thing did get into long term memory but it eventually fades away. oOnce things have gotten into memory, our memories are very very good. The thirdreason is a retrieval failure, the memory is there, we just have difficulty getting to it.oAlso may be interference, some memory may be in permanent memory, but we are retrieving the wrong thing, retrograde, anterograde interference. Permanent memory hypothesis: once you have gotten something into memory, it is there forever.Penfield was helping people who had tumors or epileptic seizures, he would go in and remove some brain material, taking the bad material away. Called psychosurgeries. Was very much concerned about removing the bad tissue but not the good tissue. If a person has an epileptic seizure, may have some hallucinations, but you don’t want to remove some places that could affect his behavior. Would open the brain up a very small whole, and can see the tumor, but can’t see the extent of the tumor, and can’t really identify goodvs bad tissue. He is going to have the patient talk to the surgeon during the surgery. You can turn on certain brain parts for very brief periods of time. While the person is talking and you stimulate a certain brain area, the patient will stop and pause. This is how he determines if it is a language area and if it is important. The vast majority of places he stimulated, over 1000 stimulations, only about 30 resulted in some kind of sensory perception. The vast majority produced no reaction. Around another 30 were dejavu like experiences. The last about 30 stimulations, produced what Penfield thought was long during memories. Stimulating this evokes some very long term memories. Could never verify that these memories were true. The dejavu experiences actually never happened to these people, but seemed like they did. Very few stimulations were potentially memory, and the memories were not verified. This idea of a permanent memory hypothesis is very strong in the field. The best evidence that our memory might be permanent is this one guy tried to study naturalistic forms of memory. Asked people who recently graduated, graduated a long time ago, who were the people you had graduated with in high school. Some of them mayhave gone to reunions, had to a lot of controls to test how good the memory. If he did a free recall, recent graduates could remember 15%, graduates 50 years ago could remember 7%, still pretty good. Then went to recognition tests or qued recall. What clubswere you in and who were in the clubs. Have a list of names, check of names that you

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 4 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
Dave Lavond
Tags
Memory processes, Traumatic brain injury, permanent memory hypothesis

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture