MEM_351_Final_Report

MEM_351_Final_Report - Introduction: The main objective of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction: The main objective of this course is to bring the control theory in a real perspective. It is so that we are taught, Preliminary control theory, Laplace Transforms, Open Loop Control, Frequency Response, Time Response and State Spaces, but what does that all mean? Of, course, the theory is brilliant in its realm of automation and control system, but it seems much too abstract to understand the theory without experiencing practical applications. Today in industry, there are control models for assembly lines, automatic control, packaging plants and so on. The theory behind it is exactly the same, but in MEM 351 we learn the practical approach. Our specific objective is to derive a closed loop control of a damped compound pendulum, with specified performance criteria of, settling time and angle criteria and so on. We learned the theory, now we will live it from start to finish, examining every component of control systems, from modeling to modification. This class will allow us to use tools such as MATLAB, Lab VIEW and SimuLINK to gain a better understanding of closed loop control systems with feedback to enhance the performance of our dynamic system.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Theory: A control system is a device or set of devices to manage, command, direct or regulate the behavior of other devices or systems. There are two common classes of control systems, with many variations and combinations: logic or sequential controls, and feedback or linear controls. There is also fuzzy logic, which attempts to combine some of the design simplicity of logic with the utility of linear control. Some devices or systems are inherently not controllable. The term "control system" may be applied to the essentially manual controls that allow an operator to, for example, close and open a hydraulic press, where the logic requires that it cannot be moved unless safety guards are in place. An automatic sequential control system may trigger a series of mechanical actuators in the correct sequence to perform a task. For example various electric and pneumatic transducers may fold and glue a cardboard box, fill it with product and then seal it in an automatic packaging machine. In the case of linear feedback systems, a control loop, including sensors, control algorithms and actuators, is arranged in such a fashion as to try to regulate a variable at a set point or reference
Background image of page 2
value. An example of this may increase the fuel supply to a furnace when a measured temperature drops. PID controllers are common and effective in cases such as this. Control systems that include some sensing of the results they are trying to achieve are making use of feedback and so can, to some extent, adapt to varying circumstances. Open-loop control systems do not directly make use of feedback, but
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 13

MEM_351_Final_Report - Introduction: The main objective of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online