PS_retina - 1 Cross section of the human retina. In this...

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2 direction of light Cross section of the human retina. In this figure, light would reach the receptors from below (i.e., through the other cells in the retina). Dowling, J. E. (1987). The Retina: An approachable part of the brain . Cambridge, MA, Belknap Press.
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3 direction of light Schematic of neurons and connections in the retina.
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4 Parasol Midget Bistratified Ganglion cells Bipolar cells Midget Diffuse S cone There are several types of ganglion cells. Most are midget (parvo) ganglion cells. Next most common are parasol (magno). Rodieck, R. W. (1998). The First Steps in Seeing . Sunderland, Sinauer.
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5 DeAngelis et al. (1995) Note that the receptive fields of neurons in the retina, lgn and primary visual cortex cover only a small part of the visual field.
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6 Basic receptive field properties of ganglion cells. Kuffler, S. W. (1953). “Discharge patterns and functional organization of the mammalian retina.” Journal of Neurophysiology 16 : 37-68.
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7 Herring ladder. Each stripe is uniform gray, but they appear darker near the light boundary and lighter near the dark boundary. The receptive field properties of ganglion cells may contribute to this perceptual effect.
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8 Densities of rods, cones and ganglion cells in the human retina as a function of eccentricity along the horizontal meridian. Data from Curcio et al. (1990) and Curcio & Allen (1990). Curcio, C. A. and K. A. Allen (1990). “Topography of ganglion cells in human retina.” The Journal of Comparative Neurology 300 : 5-25. Curcio, C. A., K. R. Sloan, et al. (1990).
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This note was uploaded on 08/12/2008 for the course PSY 323P taught by Professor Geisler during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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PS_retina - 1 Cross section of the human retina. In this...

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