PS_Form_Object_1 - The eye encounters a enormous variety of complex visual images Yet the brain somehow manages to correctly interpret almost every

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1 The eye encounters a enormous variety of complex visual images. Yet, the brain somehow manages to correctly interpret almost every visual image it receives. It is able to correctly identify objects, materials, and surface shapes, as well as shadows and other lighting effects. It does this effortlessly for scenes never encountered before. Underlying this remarkable ability is a set of sophisticated perceptual grouping mechanisms, that try to link together image features that arise from the same physical source. To understand why grouping mechanisms are essential it is useful consider context problem the visual brain must overcome.
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2 Five Difficult Problems for Vision Systems Illumination problem The illumination of scenes is highly variable and complex. Depth problem The images in the eyes are two-dimensional projections of the three- dimensional environment. Context problem Objects often appear in a complex and varying context of other objects. Viewpoint problem Objects are rarely seen from the same viewpoint. Category complexity problem The specific objects that define a category are often quite different. Fundamental Biological Constraints Limited neural resources, dynamic ranges, and physical space Most natural tasks involve dealing with one or more of these difficult general problems. Furthermore, the solutions that the visual system can come up with in natural tasks are constrained by various fundamental biological factors.
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3 Five Difficult Problems for Vision Systems Illumination problem The illumination of scenes is highly variable and complex. Depth problem The images in the eyes are two-dimensional projections of the three- dimensional environment. Context problem Objects often appear in a complex and varying context of other objects. Viewpoint problem Objects are rarely seen from the same viewpoint. Category complexity problem The specific objects that define a category are often quite different. Fundamental Biological Constraints Limited neural resources, dynamic ranges, and physical space Most natural tasks involve dealing with one or more of these difficult general problems. Furthermore, the solutions that the visual system can come up with in natural tasks are constrained by various fundamental biological factors.
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4 Context problem Objects often appear in a complex and varying context of other objects, making recognition of objects difficult. Solution
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This note was uploaded on 08/12/2008 for the course PSY 323P taught by Professor Geisler during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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PS_Form_Object_1 - The eye encounters a enormous variety of complex visual images Yet the brain somehow manages to correctly interpret almost every

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