dependent clauses

dependent clauses - Types of dependent clauses The three...

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Types of dependent clauses The three most common types of dependent clauses in Spanish are: 1. Noun clauses ( cláusulas nominales or cláusulas sustantivas ). In this case, the entire clause serves as a noun, usually as the direct object of a verb . It is normally introduced with the conjunction que [ that ]. [In Spanish, the subjunctive mood will be used in the noun clause when the verb that governs the clause is one of influence, emotion, doubt, or negation; the indicative is used when the governing verb is one of truth, certainty, reporting, or affirmation.]Example: Quiero que vengas conmigo al concierto . I want you to come with me to the concert. 2. Adjectival clauses ( cláusulas adjetivales ). Here, the entire clause takes on the function of an adjective, usually modifying a noun or pronoun, the antecedent ( antecedente ). Adjectival clauses are normally introduced by a relative pronoun such as que [ which/that ] quien ( who ), el que ( which/that/who ), or el cual ( which/that/who
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This note was uploaded on 08/12/2008 for the course SPAN 300 taught by Professor Duenas during the Summer '08 term at UNC.

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dependent clauses - Types of dependent clauses The three...

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