dbq industrialization

dbq industrialization - APUSH February 26, 2007...

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APUSH Kaplan February 26, 2007 Industrialization DBQ During the period of industrialization, America experienced great economic growth as it became the leading industrialized nation in the world, but with this tremendous progress came a price for those not in control. The lack of regulation within the U.S. allowed for industrialization, which helped the U.S. gain power as the largest industrialized nation in the world. However, this also allowed large monopolies to gain control of entire markets by driving out competition and to pay their workers low wages. Industrialization also contributed to the loss of Native American culture. Industrialization contributed to the United States becoming a strong, successful nation-state by increasing its power in the world and raising the majority of Americans’ standard of living economically and culturally, but it also created negative externalities for certain groups of Americans and redefined the social order to increase the disparity between the rich and poor. The almost laissez-faire economy within the United States allowed for industrialization, which allowed the U.S. to gain power as the largest industrialized nation in the world. It was easier for entrepreneurs to start businesses in the U.S. because of the fewest regulations in any industrialized nation in the world. In the eighteenth century, economist Adam Smith had advocated minimum government intervention in domestic and international trade and allowing individuals to pursue their own interests in
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dbq industrialization - APUSH February 26, 2007...

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