Chap2_Lectures_Slides

Chap2_Lectures_Slide - Engineering Thermodynamics Chapter 2/Lecture6 Slides Thermodynamic Quantities Units Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 1 Engineering Thermodynamics Chapter 2/Lecture6 Slides: Thermodynamic Quantities & Units
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 2 Learning Outcomes ± Understands the use of dimensions and units to characterize a measurable physical quantity ± Understands the mechanical and work- related concepts in physics and thermodynamics ± Understands thermal and heat-related concepts ± Knows the key thermodynamic properties
Background image of page 2
Conversions Between Systems of Units Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 3 Physical Quantity = Number × Unit Unity Conversion Factors (p. 68; front cover) Use of Unity Brackets Examples
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 4
Background image of page 4
Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 5 Concept Test on Units
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 6 Review Exercises on Units 1. Convert a mass of 1 short ton (or 2000 lbm) to kg. Given: System – {mass of 1 short ton} Find: m(in kg) Solution: 1 kg 1 short ton 2000 lbm 2.205 lbm 907 kg m ⎛⎞ == ⎜⎟ ⎝⎠ = •Unity brackets •Conversion table at cover page of the textbook
Background image of page 6
Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 7 Review Exercises on Units 2. Use appropriate factors to convert 1 cubic yard to US gal. Given: System – {1 cubic yard of a substance} Find: V(in US gal) Solution: 33 3 3 ft 7.48052 US gal 1 yard 1 ft 202 US gal V ⎛⎞ = ⎜⎟ ⎝⎠ = •Unity brackets •Conversion table at cover page of the textbook
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 8 Review Exercises on Units 3. Convert 55 mph to ft/s. Given: Speed ( V ) = 55 mph Find:V (in ft/s) Solution: •Unity brackets •Conversion table at cover page of the textbook mi 5280 ft 1 h 55 h 1 mi 3600 s 80.7 ft/s ⎛⎞ = ⎜⎟ ⎝⎠ =
Background image of page 8
Primary dimension: Mass (m) Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 9 Beam balances—compare masses ± The quantity of matter in a body. (Isaac Newton) ± Not to be confused with weight. Mass does not vary with gravity. ± Measure by comparison with prototypes. ± Units ± SI: kg; tonne (= 1000 kg) ± USCS: lb; short ton (2,000 lb)
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Primary dimension: Amount (N) Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 10 (kg/kmol) (kg) (kmol) M m N = ± The mole is the primary unit for the amount of substance (N). ± The mole (abbreviated as mol) is formally defined as the amount of substance containing the same number of elementary units (atoms or molecules) as there are atoms in 0.012 kg (or 12 g) of carbon-12. ± The molecular weight (M)of a substance is the ratio of the mass of one molecule of the substance to that of one-twelfth of an atom of carbon-12. Unit for molecular weight is g/mol, or kg/kmol. ± The number of molecules in 1 mol of any substance is 6.022 × 1023 (to four significant figures). This number is called Avogadro's number.
Background image of page 10
Primary dimension: Amount (N) Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi & Russell 11 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amount_of_substance ± The amount of substance of an object is a physical quantity that measures the number of elementary entities in the object.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/21/2008 for the course ME 3513 taught by Professor Felicelli during the Spring '04 term at Mississippi State.

Page1 / 48

Chap2_Lectures_Slide - Engineering Thermodynamics Chapter 2/Lecture6 Slides Thermodynamic Quantities Units Engineering Thermodynamics by Adebiyi

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online