INART - Derek Deibert Bryan Farrell INART 115 5 February...

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Derek Deibert Bryan Farrell INART 115 5 February 2008 After looking at the recording industry’s diminishing sales, it is clear where the industry is heading: into oblivion. Since the late 1990s CD sales have successively fell at about five per cent a year. While this is not enough in itself to eradicate the industry, they are also losing billions a year to illegal downloading. How is the industry to survive if they are selling no records or legal downloads? How is the face of popular music going to change if the is only enough money to record the most profitable artists? The Global Music Industry states that U.S. record sales have been falling since 1999, with one exception in 2004 when there was a slight growth. The recording industry has depended on CD sales for most of their revenue since the CD’s introduction in 1984 (Krasilovsky, 5). On the Recording Industry Association of America’s (RIAA) website, CD sales have accounted for about 12.8 billion of their total net revenue in 1999. This was before Napster became a major file sharing network. After the introduction of Napster into American life, the RIAA reported loses of about 6.7 per cent over that year.
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This note was uploaded on 03/17/2008 for the course INART 115 taught by Professor Fehrenbachpaulg during the Spring '08 term at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

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INART - Derek Deibert Bryan Farrell INART 115 5 February...

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