lecture7f07

lecture7f07 - 1 Attitudes & Social Behavior...

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1 Attitudes & Social Behavior “ATTITUDE IS THE MOST DISTINCTIVE AND INDISPENSABLE CONCEPT IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY” -- --GORDON ALLPORT Definition of Attitudes Attitudes are often defined in tortuous ways by psychologists But they have one thing in common: ____________ – Valence – positive or negative value “Attitudes are likes and dislikes” – Daryl Bem Why study attitudes? Attitudes are a central topic in Social Psychology They are important for at least 4 reasons: – They are _______________ – They serve a number of functions – They help us interpret information – *They _____________________________________ Pervasiveness There are few things about which we feel “neutral” When you switch on a game (e.g., a tennis match), you quickly start rooting for one side or the other – even if you don’t know the players Letters vs. Numbers Using the IAT, we tested letter strings (ATZLM) vs. numbers (47358) Did we find that people’s attitudes were, in fact, neutral? Attitude Functions Attitudes serve a number of purposes (functions) in our lives, including: Help us define “who we are” – __________-_____________ function Help us get along with others – _________ ___________ function Help us appraise the world we live in (including other people and objects) – _____________ function
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2 Attitudes Guide Interpretations When faced with ambiguous information, we use our attitudes to decide how to evaluate it What about “objective” information? Research suggests there is no such thing “They saw a game” In the 1950’s, Princeton and Dartmouth football teams played a grudge match Due to numerous injuries, it continues to be the worst game in the history of both schools The research Weeks later, experimenters took a film of the game to both schools Students were asked to count the number of violations made by each team In reality, each team made about the same number Would students see the game “objectively”? Summary Results Subjects viewed the opposing school as the aggressor, even though in reality their own team caused as much trouble Although they evaluated the SAME game, subjects came to very different conclusions # of Violations 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Princeton Dartmouth Princeton Dartmouth Student’s School TEAM
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3 This suggests that having an “unbiased” opinion is hard to do Student-Teacher Evaluations Students rate teachers at the end of every course They are rating the SAME instructor, but opinions vary Which of the following is the strongest predictor of teacher evaluations? – Teachers’ IQ, teachers’ friendliness, students’ IQ, students’ expected
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This note was uploaded on 08/21/2008 for the course PSYCH 321 taught by Professor Kilianski during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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lecture7f07 - 1 Attitudes & Social Behavior...

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