Homework assignment ch.3 Updated version

Homework assignment ch.3 Updated version - Anton Lund On...

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Anton Lund On page 110 of our course text, under the Key Terms , upload the first 13 terms AND their definitions into this folder. Your definitions should be a combination of your reading of the text and an understanding of its meaning. Adverse impact – A type of discrimination where the employer establishes a standard that seems to be equal to all, but in reality affects minorities and specific groups of employees negatively. An example that the book provides includes an employer’s requirement of all employees being a minimum height. In such case, it seems like the employer treats every group in the same fair way; however, some groups, including women and populations that typically are of lower height, get discriminated by this standard set by the employer. Affirmative action – Affirmative action requires an employer to make an active decision as the employer looks to hire people of populations that have been discriminated in the past. Although the idea behind it can be good, discrimination may occur again, this time to people that have not been discriminated in the past. Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) – This act forbids employers to discriminate people that are of the age of 40 or above. Lawsuits regarding ADEA usually occurs due to elimination of older people, but they may also occur due to employees joking about other employees’ age. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) – One is considered to have a disability if it affects one or more life activities, such as walking, sitting, lifting, reading, speaking etc. ADA prohibits employers to discriminate disabled people. Bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ) – A characteristic that all employees must have, for example that all employees must be over a certain age or be of a certain gender. In
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