CranialTMJTravelltriggerRheumatologicDisease-COMLEX-Step1

CranialTMJTravelltriggerRheumatologicDisease-COMLEX-Step1 -...

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define a trigger point. the area that the trigger point refers pain to is called______? how far back does the idea that trigger points are associated with some internal pathology? Who and when spent 50 years researching and documenting pain patterns? who worked with the internist in co-authoring a book on trigger points? name the book. If you were to biopsy an acute trigger point, what would you see? If you were to biopsy a chronic trigger point, what would you see? Name the 3 types of trigger points. what is the difference in the 3 types of trigger points?
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back several millennia; the origin of TP is from Germany and Scandanavian countries reference zone area of hypersensitivity in a muscle; this muscle sends sensory pain information to the spinal cord where it then refers pain to some location. normal muscle David G Simon, MD; Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual Janet Travell, MD; 1940s Active TP: hurts without touching it or when moving the involved muscle; Latent: hurts with digital stimulation; Tenderpoint: loc­ ated at trigger point and tender to deep Active TP, Latent TP, and Tenderpoint muscle atrophy with fatty infiltration, incre­ ased number of nuclei per muscle fiber, fibrosis, serous exudates and abnormal muco­ polysaccharide deposits
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how does one acquire a TP? What maintains the TP? List the mechanical stre­ sses that maintain TP. List the nutritional inade­ quacies that maintain TP. What metabolic or endo deficits can maintain a TP? What psychological factors can maintain TPs? What chronic infections can maintain TPs? What chronic infestations can maintain TPs? Name some other factors that can maintain TPs?
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poor posture, repetitive move­ ments, short leg, short first long second toe (aka Morton's Foot); constriction of muscles, abuse of muscles, immobility, small MNMPCO: Mec­ hanical Stress, Nutritional Inade­ quacies, Metabolic & Endo deficits; Psychological fa­ ctors; Chronic infection or Infestation; Other factors same way you get somatic dysfunction or possibly a manifestation of somatic dysfunction Stoic personality (workaholic), ho­ pelessness, dep­ ression hypothyroidism, hypoglycemia, gout lack of B1,B6, B12, folic acid, vitC, Mg2+, Fe, Ca, K+ allergic rhinitis, impaired sleep, and nerve entrapments Diphyllobothrium latum (fish tapeworm); Giardia lamblia "Bever Fever"; Entamoeba histolytica Viral Dz, Bacterial Infections: UTIs, Sinusitis, Dental Infections
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what are the steps in diagnosing a trigger Point? Trapezius, SCM (sternal), tempo­ ralis, and semispinalis capitis are the possible muscles involved in what type of pain? SCM (clavicular and sternal), frontalis, and zygomaticus major are possible muscles involved in what type of pain? What are the
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CranialTMJTravelltriggerRheumatologicDisease-COMLEX-Step1 -...

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