Texture

Texture - I. Texture a. The balance between harmony and...

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I. Texture a. The balance between harmony and melody b. Texture equals pitch only (no percussion) c. Types i. Homophony 1. Basic texture 2. One main melody with harmonic accompaniment 3. Miles Davis, “So What” a. Main melody: trumpet b. Accompaniment: piano (chords), bass 4. Subcategories a. Block chord texture i. One melody with accompaniment ii. All pitches performed at the same time, in the same rhythm (harmonize together) iii. Miles Davis, “So What” 1. Opening riff: performed in block chord texture: trumpet, alto sax, tenor sax iv. Era of big bands 1. Big bands: saxes, trumpets playing at once 2. Block chords: also known as “soli” a. Duke Ellington, “Cottontail” (saxophone section) b. Countermelody i. Secondary melodic line ii. Heard beneath the main melody, isn’t directly competing with it 1. Some musical interest, but not distracting from main melody 2. For example, playing under a vocalist 3. Billie Holiday, “A Sailboat in the Moonlight” a. Main melody: vocalist Billie Holiday
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Texture - I. Texture a. The balance between harmony and...

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