IPM Booklet - Chapter 1 Integrated Pest Management Integrated Pest Management(IPM has been developed as a way to control pests without relying solely on

IPM Booklet - Chapter 1 Integrated Pest Management...

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Chapter 1. Integrated Pest Management 1 Chapter 1 Integrated Pest Management Integrated Pest Management (IPM) has been developed as a way to control pests without relying solely on pesticides. IPM is a systematic plan which brings together different pest control tactics into one program. This Chapter defines IPM, the various pest control methods used in IPM, and how to set up an IPM program, and provides information to help pesticide applicators manage insects, plant diseases, weeds, and vertebrate pests. Integrated Pest Management provides farmers with choices about how to manage pests safely and effectively. Photo: NRCS
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PRIVATE PESTICIDE APPLICATOR TRAINING MANUAL 19 th Edition 2 Notes Page
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Chapter 1. Integrated Pest Management 3 Section 1: What Is Integrated Pest Management? With IPM, a farmer uses pesticides as one tool in an overall pest-control program. Let’s look at what each of the words in the term Integrated Pest Management means: w Integrated: a focus on interactions of pests, crops, the environ- ment, and various control methods. This approach considers all available tactics and how these tactics fit with other agricultural practices used. w Pest: an organism that conflicts with our profit, health, or con- venience. If a species does not exist in numbers that seriously affect these factors, it is not considered a pest. w Management: a way to keep pests below the levels where they can cause economic damage. Management does not mean eradicating pests. It means finding tactics that are effective and economical, and that keep environmental damage to a minimum. This Section describes the development of IPM and the cultural, biological, mechanical, physical, chemical, and legal control methods used in IPM. Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the difference among the Economic Damage, Economic Injury Level, and Economic Threshold. 2. Identify the three elements of a successful IPM program. 3. Provide two reasons why pest management has shifted from routine pesticide application to IPM.
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PRIVATE PESTICIDE APPLICATOR TRAINING MANUAL 19thEdition4Integrated Pest Management (IPM)Almost all farmers do at least some IPM through normal crop production practices. Integrated pest management is a balanced, tactical approach to pest control. It involves taking action to anticipate pest outbreaks and to prevent potential damage. IPM utilizes a wide range of pest control strategies or tactics. The goal of this strategy is to prevent pests from reaching economically or aesthetically damaging levels with the least risk to the environment. IPM programs are very site-specific. IPM is based on the identification of pests, accurate measurement of pest populations, assessment of damage levels, and knowledge of available pest management strategies or tactics that enable the specialist to make intelligent decisions about control. IPM offers the possibility of improving the effectiveness of pest control programs while reducing some of the negative effects. Many successful IPM programs have reduced pesticide use and increased protection of the environment. Pesticide use is and will continue to be significant in food and fiber production, forestry, turf and landscape maintenance, and public health. Pest management has shifted from relying heavily on pesticides to using an integrated approach based on pest assessment, decision making, and evaluation. Why Practice IPM?Why have pest managers shifted to IPM when chemical pesticides so often succeed at controlling pests? There are many reasons to broaden pest management beyond the use of chemicals.wIPM helps to keep a balanced ecosystem.Every ecosystem, made up of living things and their non-living environment, has a balance; the actions of one kind of organism in the ecosystem usually affect other species. Introducing chemicals into the ecosystem
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  • Fall '16
  • KOECH
  • Microeconomics, Pesticide, Pesticide application, Biological pest control, integrated pest management

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