aaa pneumonia compiled

aaa pneumonia compiled - Etiology and Transmission Etiology...

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Etiology and Transmission
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Etiology Bacteria is the most common cause of pneumonia. Other causes are viruses, fungi, and other agents. A healthy person’s nose and throat often contain bacteria or viruses that cause pneumonia. Your lungs are more likely to be infected during or after a cold or a long term chronic illness.
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Transmission Pneumonia is spread through people who are ill or carrying the bacteria in their throat. You can get pneumonia from respiratory droplets from the nose and mouth of an infected person. It is common especially for people with children to carry their bacteria with being sick. You can get pneumonia in your daily life such as school, work, or at a hospital.
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Pathogenesis and Clinical Features
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Pathogenesis Less common causes of infections pneumonia are fungi and parasites. White bloods cells, mainly lymphocytes, activate certain chemical cytokines which allow fluid to leak into the alveoli. This combination of cell destruction and fluid-filled alveoli interrupts the normal transportation of oxygen into the bloodstream.
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Clinical Features Streptococcus Pneumoniae Pneumonia bacteria, otitis media, meningitis, sinusitis peritonitis and arthritis Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Majority with upper respiratory tract infections with fever, cough, malaise and headache. May lead to tracheobronchitis with fever and non productive cough; radiologically confirmed pneumonia develops in about 5-10% of cases; rare extra pulmonary syndromes, including cardiology neuologic and dermatologic findings.
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Diagnosis of Pneumonia And Epidemiology
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Diagnosis To diagnose pneumonia health care providers rely on a patient's symptoms and findings from physical examination. Information from a chest X-ray, blood tests, and sputum cultures may also be helpful.
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Diagnosis (cont’d) The chest X-ray is typically used for diagnosis in hospitals and some clinics with X-ray facilities. However, in a community setting (general practice), pneumonia is usually diagnosed based on symptoms and physical examination alone.
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This note was uploaded on 08/25/2008 for the course BIO 2710 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '07 term at Oakland CC.

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aaa pneumonia compiled - Etiology and Transmission Etiology...

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